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Prophetic Expositions, vol. 2

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    CHAPTER II. THE SOUNDING OF THE SEVEN TRUMPETS.—REV. SEVENTH, EIGHTH, AND NINTH CHAPTERS

    The great leading features of Daniel’s visions were the four great governments of antiquity, beginning with the Babylonian, and ending with the Roman, in its papal form. Not so, however, with John; he lived when three of those governments had passed away, and the fourth and last, was in being, and in the height of its glory, as an universal monarchy. Under that government John was in banishment in the isle of Patmos, “for the word of God, and the testimony of Jesus Christ.” Accordingly, instead of predicting the rise and triumph of either of those four great governments, it was his part to give the prophetic history of the fall of the last of the four, and give us the various means by which that great persecuting system should come to ruin.PREX2 132.1

    The first decisive step, as has been already remarked, in the downfall of Rome, was the removal of the seat of empire from the west to the east. Until then its unity had been very faithfully preserved. After that, division and subdivision became the order of the day, until the final ruin of the empire.PREX2 132.2

    The sounding of the seven trumpets I understand to shadow forth the instrumentalities by which the Roman empire was to be overthrown and subverted, and finally ruined.PREX2 132.3

    The empire, after Constantine, was divided into three parts; and hence the frequent remark, “a third part of men,“ etc, in allusion to the third part of the empire which was under the scourge. Under the first four trumpets the two western divisions fell, and under the fifth and sixth the eastern empire was crushed; but under the seventh trumpet great Babylon entire will sink to rise no more at all. Then the church of the First-born will return from her captivity, to the land of promise and everlasting life; and the kingdoms of this world shall become the kingdoms of our Lord and his Christ.PREX2 133.1

    In giving an outline of this subject, I shall, for the most part, follow Keith, in his “Signs of the Times,” on the first four trumpets. I should be glad to give his remarks and historical quotations entire, would my limits, which are prescribed for this work, admit of it.PREX2 133.2

    The subject properly begins with the second verse of the eighth chapter; and the first verse should have been annexed to the seventh chapter, it being the conclusion of the opening of the seals.PREX2 133.3

    From the 2nd to the 5th verse of chapter 8., we have the prefatory remarks, preparatory to the sounding of the trumpets. Then follows the sounding of the first angel.PREX2 133.4

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