Loading...
Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents

The Empires of the Bible from the Confusion of Tongues to the Babylonian Captivity

 - Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "undefined".
  • Weighted Relevancy
  • Content Sequence
  • Relevancy
  • Earliest First
  • Latest First
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    ORIGIN OF THE STATE AND EMPIRE

    But as apostasy continued, and the asserters of dominion and power over others became more bold, there came Nimrod, the one, and the first one, who was so bold as to take the himself from the idols the title and the prerogatives of king, which by the makers of the idols had been taken from God and placed upon the idol.EB xvii.1

    This is not to say that there should be no governments, nor is it to say that there should be no monarchy on earth. It is only to say that without such apostasy there never could have been monarchy. But when such apostasy had come, and consequent turbulence and violence prevailed, it was better that there should be even monarchy such as that of Nimrod, than that there should be no government at all, but only anarchy. It were better that there should such government as that of Nimrod, or of Nero, than that there should be none on earth. But apostasy must of necessity go a long way from true and original government—self-government with God—before there could be required such government as that of Nimrod or of Nero.EB xvii.2

    The peopling of the earth by the sons of Noah is the origin of nations in the world; for of the sons of Noah and their families, after their generations, it is written: “By these were the nations divided in the earth after the flood;” and “of them was the whole earth overspread.” This is the true record of the peopling of the earth, and there is no other. without this the history of any people must lack that essential part—the true beginning. But whoever will really study the tenth chapter of Genesis will know the true origin of every people and nation of the world.EB xvii.3

    In this first peopling of the earth, the government was that of the individual. The associations were those of the family, or the enlarged family—tribes; and the government was of the individual—self-government. There a Society, but no State. The earth was free to all: there were no territorial lines. But apostasy grew and prevailed. And as apostasy grew, despotism in man inevitably grew and asserted dominion over others. This culminated in Nimrod’s ambition—the ambition not only for kingship, but for empire; not only the establishment of a kingdom of single government, but also the expansion of single government into widespread dominion. Thus arose the State: territorialism, and imperialism. Men were made subject to power merely because they happened to be in the territory claimed by the would-be monarch. This meant conquest and oppression; because God had created mankind free, and to be free: and even in his apostasy the love of freedom is in him. But in the presence of monarchism and imperialism, this freedom of man never could be recognized or have any place: it must be ruthlessly crushed out in order that monarchy and empire, the one-man power of the world, might prevail and be duly honored. This is how it is that Nimrod was a mighty hunter before the Lord: not merely a hunter of wild beasts, but more a pursuer and crusher of men; and, therefore, a more exact translation of the original expression reads, “He was an over-bearing tyrant in Jehovah’s sight.”EB xvii.4

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents