Loading...
Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents

The Great Second Advent Movement: Its Rise and Progress

 - Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "undefined".
  • Weighted Relevancy
  • Content Sequence
  • Relevancy
  • Earliest First
  • Latest First
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    SOUTH AMERICA

    It was through the printed page that the views of Seventh-day Adventists were first introduced into South America. In October, 1891, Messrs. Snyder, Stauffer, and Nowlin began their work as canvassers in Argentine. In 1893, by vote of the General Conference, Elder F. H. Westphal, of Illinois, a German minister, connected with the work in this mission field, and in 1894, Frank Kelley, of California, went to the United States of Colombia as a self-supporting missionary. A few months later, these were followed by other laborers, and thus a beginning was made in this new mission. In 1896 the following report was given concerning the work in this field: Chile has one minister, Elder G. H. Baber, who arrived Oct. 19, 1895; and two canvassers, F. W. Richards and F. H. Davis. Argentine has also two ministers, F. H. Westphal and Jean Vuilleumier; and two canvassers, O. Oppegard and C. A. Nowlin. Besides these there are four Bible workers, Lucy Post, Mr. and Mrs. Snyder, and John McCarthy. Brazil has two ministers, Elder H. W. Thurston and F. H. Graff; and three canvassers, A. B. Stauffer, J. F. and A. J. A. Berger. British Guiana has two ministers, Elder W. G. Kneeland and Elder P. Giddings; and two medical missionaries, Dr. B. J. Fercoit and his wife.GSAM 434.2

    In 1896, there had been one thousand dollars’ worth of books sold in Chile, and thirty Sabbath-keepers had accepted the Sabbath and kindred truths by reading the literature purchased of the canvassers. In Brazil and Argentine books had been sold to the amount of ten thousand dollars; and what was still better, there were one hundred observing the Sabbath. One church and five Sabbath-schools had been organized. In Argentine there were three organized churches, at Buenos Ayres, Crespo, and San Cristobal, respectively. There was also one organized church in British Guiana, and fifty Sabbath-keepers, making a total of one hundred and fifty Seventh-day Adventists in South America.GSAM 435.1

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents