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    MISCELLANEOUS MOTIONS

    In this class are three motions; namely, 1. To Reconsider; 2. To Fill Blanks; 3. To Renew a Motion.KSDPR 19.3

    1. TO RECONSIDER. - When a motion has been passed, it is sometimes found advisable, afterward, to modify, reverse, or otherwise change the action taken. To provide for such a contingency is the object of the motion to reconsider, - a motion which, if carried, brings the subject back before the house just as it stood before the vote was taken upon it. There are given in the Diagram twenty rules governing this motion, - eight negative, and twelve affirmative. As the reader will see, it is a motion subject to many peculiarities. It can be made when any other business is before the house, even if it interrupts a member in his speech; but action on such motion can not be taken to interfere with current business. In this case the motion is made, seconded, and entered upon the minutes; then the business before the house proceeds, and the motion to reconsider is held over to be called up at any time before the close of the session when nothing else is pending. The motion to reconsider must be made on the same day on which the motion to be reconsidered was made; but it need not be acted upon on that day, as stated above. This motion must be made by one who voted on the prevailing side, as otherwise it might be used by a faction to greatly embarrass and delay proceedings. But the prevailing side is not always the side on which there is a majority of the numbers. For instance, on a motion which requires a two-thirds vote, a majority might vote for it, but if less than the requisite two-thirds, the motion is lost. The prevailing side is then the minority, - the little more than one-third who voted against it. A motion to reconsider must in this case come from one who voted against the measure. When a motion to reconsider is passed, a person who had exhausted his privilege of debate when the question was first before the house can not discuss it further. If he wishes to speak again on the subject, his only recourse is to get in his speech while the motion to reconsider is pending.KSDPR 20.1

    2. FILLING BLANKS. - Resolutions are frequently introduced, or reports of committees made, involving the appointing of a certain number of persons to serve on the committee or otherwise, a certain sum of money to be raised, or something to be done after a certain length of time, these points being left blank in the resolution or report, as it is desired that they should be left wholly to the action of the members in open meeting. In these cases suggestions to fill these blanks can be made without the formality of a motion, by naming the number of persons, the sum of money, or the length of time; and in case a number of suggestions are made, the only way the mind of the assembly can be ascertained is to try the vote on the highest number, the largest sum, or the longest time. For if a majority are in favor of the highest figure in each case, they would be in favor of all that was called for in the lowest; and if the motion were made on the latter, they could not vote against it; and so the question would be decided contrary to their will.KSDPR 21.1

    3. RENEWING A MOTION. - As a general rule, the introduction of any motion that alters the state of affairs makes it admissible to renew any privileged or incidental motion (except a motion for the orders of the day, or for suspension of the rules) or any subsidiary motion (except an amendment), as in such case the real question before the assembly is a different one.KSDPR 22.1

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