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    KEY TO DIAGRAM

    IN the foregoing Diagram, all the different motions are presented in their order; as, Privileged, Incidental, Subsidiary, the Main Question, and Miscellaneous.KSDPR 5.1

    PRIVILEGED MOTIONS are so called because, on account of their importance, they take precedence of all other questions whatever.KSDPR 5.2

    INCIDENTAL MOTIONS are such as grow out of other questions, and therefore take precedence of, and must be decided before, the questions which give rise to them.KSDPR 5.3

    SUBSIDIARY MOTIONS are such as are applied to other motions for the sake of disposing of them in some other way than by direct adoption or rejection.KSDPR 5.4

    PRINCIPAL MOTIONS. - By Main Question, or Principal Motion, is meant a motion introduced on any subject when no other business is before the house.KSDPR 5.5

    MISCELLANEOUS MOTIONS. - These are such as can not be included, on account of the rules which govern them, in any one of the classes above named.KSDPR 5.6

    ORDER OF PRECEDENCE. - These motions, excepting the miscellaneous, are arranged in the order of their precedence, both as respects the classes, and as individual motions in respect to one another. By order of precedence is meant that when any given motion is pending, any motion standing above it in the list may be made, and be in order; but any standing below it, except such as are indicated on the Diagram, would not be in order. For instance, the motion to Fix the Time to which to Adjourn, when no other question is before the house, and the motion to Adjourn when in any way qualified, become principal (not privileged) motions, subject to the laws of the principal motion; and Questions of Privilege can have any subsidiary motion applied to them. But if a principal motion is made, and in reference to it the subsidiary motion is made “that it lie on the table,” it would not be in order to move the Previous Question, or to Postpone to a certain day, or to Commit, to Amend, or to Postpone indefinitely; because the motion to lay the subject on the table takes precedence of the other motions named, and must be decided before they can be made. And so of other motions in the order in which they stand. The general rule is that when a motion is made, any motion standing above it in the list would be in order, but any standing below it would not be in order; and by a glance at the list, this can be determined instantly.KSDPR 5.7

    RULES. - All motions are governed by certain rules. These rules are, in the Diagram, connected by direct lines with the motions to which they apply; and each motion is in the same manner connected with all the rules belonging to it. By this arrangement, the reader is enabled to see at a glance what particular rules apply to any given motion, and, conversely, how many motions come under any particular rule. Thus he has spread out before him, as on a map, the whole field of parliamentary law. All that may not be done is placed at the left under the head of Negative Rules; and all that may be done is found at the right under Affirmative Rules. If any doubt arises in reference to any motion, run the eye along the lines leading from that motion to find the rules which govern it. By this arrangement no time is lost in examining irrelevant matter, and the eye is directed to just what applies to the case in question.KSDPR 6.1

    MOTIONS, AND FORMS IN WHICH THEY ARE SUBMITTED. - All business should be introduced by a motion made by some member of the assembly, society, or whatever the organization may be. No one can properly make or second a motion, without “obtaining the floor.” To “obtain the floor” is to rise and address the presiding officer by whatever title he may be known in the body in session; as, Mr. President, Chairman, Moderator, etc., and be recognized by such officer. The officer recognizes the member by calling his name, or making such other remarks as will show that the person who has addressed him is the one he recognizes. Then the member has the floor.KSDPR 7.1

    Having obtained the floor, do not say, “Mr. Chairman, I motion” so and so; nor “Mr. Chairman, I move you” so and so. Simply say, “Mr. Chairman, I move” so and so.KSDPR 8.1

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