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    THE RAM, GOAT, AND LITTLE HORN OF DAN.VIII

    Standing at the right of the series of beasts last described will be seen another line of prophecy, consisting of a Ram, Goat and Little Horn. This vision is found in Daniel 8, and in it we are again conducted over a portion of the world’s great highway, with additional particulars concerning the mighty kingdoms that we pass along our journey. Thus we have line upon line till the subject is made so plain that no man, however poor or wayfaring he may be, need err therein. On the symbols of this chapter, the ram, he-goat, and little horn which waxed exceeding great, the prophet received the following instruction: The ram which thou sawest having two horns, are the kings of Media and Persia. The higher of the two horns came up last. Verse 3. This represented the Persian division of the empire, which rose last, and became the leading influence in the nation. The ram with the two horns was the well-known emblem of the Medes and Persians. This symbol is placed on the Chart, on a line with the breast and arms and the bear, as it denotes the same power.KPC 19.1

    The goat which came against the ram had at his first appearance, not represented on the Chart, a notable horn between his eyes. This goat and horn are explained by the angel, in verse 21, thus: “And the rough goat is the king of Grecia; and the great horn that is between his eyes is the first king.” This king was Alexander the Great, a man of unbridled appetite and lust, and who eight years after he overthrew the Persian empire at the battle of Arbela, B.C.331, died at Babylon in a drunken fit, at the age of 33, B.C.323. This horn was thus broken, and four came up in its stead, as represented on the Chart. In explanation of this change, the angel said, “And whereas, the great horn being broken, four came up in its stead;” “four kingdoms shall stand up out of the nation.” Verse 22.KPC 20.1

    These kingdoms were Macedonia, Thrace, Syria and Egypt, into which the empire was divided shortly after Alexander’s death, governed respectively by Cassander, Lysimachus, Seleucus and Ptolemy.KPC 20.2

    “And out of one of them came forth a little horn,” verses 9, 23-27, represented on the Chart by the side of the cross, below the goat.KPC 20.3

    Rome was not connected with the people of God, and hence is not introduced into prophecy, till after its conquest of Macedonia, one of the horns of the goat; hence, it is represented as coming forth from one of these horns. That this little horn which waxed exceeding great was Rome, the following considerations prove:KPC 20.4

    1. It was to rise in the latter part of their kingdom, that is, of the four kingdoms. So did Rome, so far as its place in the prophecy is concerned. Its connection with the Jews commenced B.C.161.1 Mac.viii. (Josephus’ Antiq.,B.xii,c.x.,sec. 6. Prideaux, vol.ii,p.166) 2. It was little at first. So was Rome. 3. It waxed “exceeding great, toward the cast and toward the south.” So did Rome. It conquered Macedonia B.C.168; Syria,etc., to the river Tigris, B.C.65; Egypt, B.C.30. “From this horn’s increasing toward the south and east particularly, Sir Isaac Newton infers that it arose in the north-west corner of the goat’s dominion, i.e., in Italy; which points directly to the Romans 4. “It cast down some of the host and of the stars to the ground.” So did Rome; persecuting the disciples and ministers of Jesus as no other power ever did. 5. “He magnified himself even to the Prince of the host. Thus did Rome, when both Herod and Pontius Pilate conspired against Jesus. 6. He shall destroy wonderfully ... the mighty and the holy people.” Let from fifty to one hundred millions of martyrs make good this charge against persecuting Rome. (See Religious Encyclopedia). 7. It was the only power which succeeded the four kingdoms which waxed “exceeding great.” 8. In this vision, Grecia succeeds Medo-Persia, just as it had been seen twice before; and it is absurd to suppose that the power which follows them in this vision is a different power from the one which twice before had been seen succeeding them, in chapters 2 and 3; and that power was Rome.” 9. “He shall be broken without hand.” How clear a reference to the stone cut out without hand which smites the image upon its feet. Chap 2:34.KPC 21.1

    It is not inappropriate that the cross is so prominently represented by the side of this horn; for although this power has been able to stand up against the Prince of princes, and put the Son of God to death, the day will come - a day, thank God, now not far distant - when the cross shall triumph, when its day of victory will come and all who have opposed its righteous claims will be broken and destroyed.KPC 22.1

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