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The Present Truth, vol. 16

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    February 1, 1900

    “Plain Living Ensures Good Health in Babylon” The Present Truth, 16, 5.

    WWP

    W. W. Prescott

    Although the king of Babylon changed the name of Daniel, and gave him the name of Belteshazzar, according to the name of his god, yet his character remained unchanged, and he continued loyal to the King of heaven and the principles of that kingdom, as is shown by the record.PTUK February 1, 1900, page 69.1

    “But Daniel purposed in his heart that he would not defile himself with the portion of the king’s meat, nor with the wine which he drank: therefore he requested of the prince of the eunuchs that he might not defile himself. Now God had brought Daniel into favour and tender love with the prince of the eunuchs. And the prince of the eunuchs said unto Daniel, I fear my lord the king, who hath appointed your meat and your drink; for why should he see your faces worse liking than the children which are of your sort? then shall ye make me endanger my head to the king.”PTUK February 1, 1900, page 69.2

    It is clear that Daniel understood the gospel of the kingdom, and how the matter of eating and drinking was related to it. He did not ask for a change of diet merely because the food provided for him was different from that to which he had been accustomed, or because he wanted something which would please his palate better. He was acting, upon principle. He had learned that the kingdom of God is within you, “that he was the temple of the living God,” that “the Spirit (life) of God dwelleth in you,” and that “if any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy: for the temple of God is holy.” Although he was a captive in the dominion of the king of Babylon, yet he did not forget that God was his King, and that the principles of His kingdom were still to control in his life. The test came upon the question of food and drink. Should he follow the diet prescribed by the king of Babylon, or that prescribed by the King of heaven? The basis upon which he rested his choice reveals the true relationship between food and character, and shows how we may work with God or against Him in His plan to restore His image in us, and thus to place us again in dominion over the works of His hands.PTUK February 1, 1900, page 69.3

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