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    TRACT AND MISSIONARY WORK

    We hail the appearance, and witness the rising prosperity, of the Tract and Missionary Society among us, with great joy, and highest hopes as to the efficiency of this means of grace. Like every other means to accomplish great good in the cause of Christ, however, this must be pushed forward with vigilance at every step. God bless Bro. Haskell, and send him to all parts of the wide field to plead with our people in behalf of this worthy institution.EAAP 30.1

    This Tract and Missionary work must be encouraged by every proper means. And the trustees of the Publishing Association will doubtless all agree on the following points:—EAAP 30.2

    1. To discount one-fourth on all bound books and pamphlets.EAAP 30.3

    2. To discount one-half on tracts.EAAP 30.4

    3. To receive one-half the wholesale prices of books, pamphlets, and tracts, furnished to T. and M. Societies from the Book Fund, and one-half from the Societies.EAAP 30.5

    4. To pay all common railroad freights on books to any distance not exceeding 1,500 miles. Express charges on books to be paid by the receiver.EAAP 30.6

    And we would here call especial attention to Bro. Littlejohn’s pamphlet on “The Constitutional Amendment: or, the Sunday, the Sabbath, the Change, and the Restitution.” This work is adapted, above all others on our catalogue, for general circulation by the Tract and Missionary Society. It is candid and able. It is in a style to meet the taste, and also the wants of the intelligent reading public. This pamphlet should be widely circulated to open the way for Bro. Littlejohn’s full work, containing the discussion, also, between himself and the Statesman. The terms of our publications to the T. and M. Society are made as easy as possible to encourage that living, efficient organization.EAAP 31.1

    Again, faith in the work of God, as manifested in the cause of the third message from its beginning, in the manifestation of the spirit of prophecy among us, is not increasing in the minds of those who do not read Mrs. W. ’s works. Those who read them are established. Those who do not read them waver, and are exposed to the poisonous influence of those who are at war with Mrs. W. ’s plain testimonies. The most proper way to encourage an intelligent faith in the testimonies of the Spirit of God to the church, is to urge the reading of the books. These books are not what a misinformed public suppose them to be. Nothing will disarm prejudice, and increase faith in this work, like reading the books. A case at Woodland favorably illustrates this matter. When Elders Loughborough and Cornell were there with the tent, in the summer of 1872, a cry was raised against the visions, and one man sent for one of the books, and boasted that he would soon be able to expose the whole matter. The book came, the gentleman read it and was silent. His friends called for the book, but he would not let them have it, and there the matter ended. And when Mrs. W. visited Woodland, in the autumn of the same year, she was heard with intense interest. The time is not far distant when the T. and M. Society will put these works into the hands of all candid persons who desire to read them, especially Sabbath-keepers. Mrs. W. hopes to complete volumes two and three before next General Conference. These three volumes are designed to contain her views of the great controversy, from the fall of Satan to the destruction of sin and sinners at the second death, including much practical matter especially applicable to our time.EAAP 31.2

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