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    PREFACE

    While Eld. Cornell was holding meetings in Chelsea, Mass., last summer, he was challenged to discuss the question of the Sabbath. Arrangements being made, the discussion was held in Library Hall, Chelsea, commencing Nov. 8, 1869, and continuing four evenings, in alternate speeches of twenty minutes.DSQ69 5.1

    A reporter was employed, who attended the first evening; but on entering the Hall the second evening, we received a note from him, stating that ill health prevented his attendance. As it was then impossible to procure another, I proceeded to note the speeches as I was able, not I professing to be able to give a verbatim report. On writing out my notes, and submitting the result to the parties, they approved it, both preferring a plain, concise statement of their ideas as presented, to a lengthy and verbatim report.DSQ69 5.2

    In regard to the difference in length of the speeches of both parties, there are two causes for it. Both speakers increased in rapidity of speech as the discussion progressed. And, in several cases, they read at considerable length what they had previously prepared. This was the case with Eld. Cornell’s argument on “the Covenants,” and his “Reasons,” numbered one to fifteen. Also with Eld. Grant’s list of “Facts,” read the last evening. When they reasoned extemporaneously, I took each particular point or argument, clothing it as nearly as I was able in the language of the speakers, rejecting repetitions and redundancies, anxious that neither of them should lose anything in the report in the force and clearness of his statement. But what they read I copied verbatim from the copy furnished by the parties, and of course such speeches are of much greater length.DSQ69 5.3

    As Eld. Grant was obliged to leave Boston before I could write it all out, I called on him in Rochester, N. Y., at the time of the “Advent Christian National Convention,” and submitted that part of the report to him which he had not previously heard read. He then, as he had already done by the other part, indorsed it as a fair, candid presentation of his arguments, and called on Eld. Sheldon, of Wisconsin, to witness to his indorsement of it. I requested him to send to me a written statement to that effect, to be published with the report, which he promised to do. As it has not yet arrived, and the printers wish to make up the first form, I make this statement in the preface.DSQ69 6.1

    J. H. Waggoner.
    Battle Creek, Mich., Dec. 1, 1869.

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