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    February 25, 1897

    “The Will of God” The Signs of the Times, 23, 8.

    E. J. Waggoner

    Some people never think of the will of God except when some disaster comes. Somebody dies, and they say that is the will of God, and we must bow to it. They attribute only that which is terrible or sorrowful to the will of the Lord. When anything comes that we can rejoice in, they seem to think that that is something that slipped in when the Lord was not watching. That is heathenism. Molech, the god of the heathen, was made to represent the idea of God always watching in anger over the people, and they offered their children as sacrifices to appease his anger. The Lord is good. His tender mercy is over all his works. He sends joy and peace; and even the sorrow which come as the result of the curse and sin, he turns to our good, and those who love him will get good in them. “All things work together for good to them that love God.”SITI February 25, 1897, page 113.1

    We like to do everything we can for our children. We like to have them enjoy themselves. Sometimes they ask something that we know is not best, and we have to deny them. Suppose they should go away grumbling, and say that we never tried to do anything for them. “It is his will; and I suppose we must yield to it.” They know better. They know that we plan enjoyments for them, and desire their happiness; and when something comes up that is contrary to their minds, they feel it is all right. They thought it was the best thing, but they have confidence in our judgment, and so give it up. In that way they get the good out of that very thing that is denied them.SITI February 25, 1897, page 113.2

    Sometimes things may look very dubious. The way seems dark, and there are troubles and difficulties on every side. Now shall we groan over it and mourn and get all the hardness out of it? Some people seem to think that we must be duly solemn and mournful about a trial, because the Lord wants to make us miserable, and we must make it as hard as possible. No; there is good in it, and we get the good if we believe what the Lord says. We may not be able to see how there can be good in it; but he is the one who is to make it work for good. We do not have to make it work for good, and so we need not worry if we can not see how it will be done. We can not understand how the Lord will turn a temptation of the evil into strength for us. If he should tell us how he does it, we could not do it nor comprehend it. As it is his power alone that does it, we need not be troubled about how it is done.SITI February 25, 1897, page 113.3

    What a blessed thing it would be if men could recognize the will of God in prosperity, as well as in the adversity that they suffer! It is the will of God that men should be saved. Why do not men submit to that? If they should, they would find more pleasure in God’s will.SITI February 25, 1897, page 113.4

    It is the will of God that we should be delivered from this present evil world. Galatians 1:4. It is the “good-pleasure of his will” that he has made us accepted in the Beloved. It is the will of God that Christ should save us, and raise us up at the last day. John 6:39. Paul expected “a prosperous journey by the will of God,” to visit the church at Rome. And he had it too, although he was shipwrecked on the way; for he knew that “all things works together for good to them that love God.” Romans 8:28.SITI February 25, 1897, page 113.5

    If people who talk so solemnly about submitting to the will of God, whenever some affliction occurs, would talk also about submitting to his will in the sunshine, the showers, the air, the food, the flowers, and the fruits of the earth, they would soon learn that God is not always trying to make it unpleasant for his children; and they would soon be able to say, “I delight to do thy will, O my God; yea, thy law is within my heart.” E. J. W.SITI February 25, 1897, page 113.6

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