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    09 THE TWO GREAT PRINCIPLES OF THIS GOVERNMENT

    HAVING given us data by which to determine the location, chronology, and rapid rise of this power, John now proceeds to describe the appearance of the two-horned beast, and speak of his acts in such a manner as clearly to indicate his character, both apparent and real. Every specification thus far examined has held the application imperatively to the United States, and we shall find this one no less strong in the same direction.MANA 131.1

    This symbol has “two horns like a lamb.” To those who have studied the prophecies of Daniel and John, horns upon a beast are no unfamiliar features. The ram (Daniel 8:3) had two horns. The he-goat that came up against him had at first one notable horn between his eyes. Verse 5. This was broken, and four came up in its place toward the four winds of heaven. Verse 8. From one of these came forth another horn, which waxed exceeding great. Verse 9. The fourth beast of Daniel 7 had ten horns. Among these, a little horn with eyes and mouth, far-seeing, crafty, and blasphemous, arose. Daniel 7:8. The dragon and leopard beast of Revelation 12, 13, denoting the same as the fourth beast of Daniel 7 in its two phases, having each the same number of horns, signifying the same thing. And the symbol under consideration has two horns like a lamb. From the use of the horns on the other symbols, some facts are apparent which may guide us to an understanding of their use on this last one.MANA 131.2

    A horn is used in the Scriptures as a symbol of strength and power, as in Deuteronomy 33:17, and of glory and honor, as in Job 16:15.MANA 132.1

    A horn is sometimes used to denote a nation as a whole, as the four horns of the goat, the little horn of Daniel 8, and the ten horns of the fourth beast of Daniel 7; and sometimes some particular feature of the government; as the first horn of the goat, which denoted not the nation as a whole, but the civil power, as centered in the first king, Alexander the Great.MANA 132.2

    Horns do not always denote division, as in the case of the four horns of the goat, etc.; for the two horns of the ram denote the union of Media and Persia in one government.MANA 132.3

    A horn is not used exclusively to represent civil power; for the little horn of Daniel’s fourth beast, the papacy, was a horn when it plucked up three other horns, and established itself in 538. But it was then purely an ecclesiastical power, and so remained for two hundred and seventeen years from that time, when Pepin, in the year 755, made the Roman pontiff a grant of some rich provinces in Italy, which first constituted him temporal monarch. (Goodrich’s History of the Church, p. 98; Bower’s History of the Popes, vol. 2, p. 108.)MANA 132.4

    With these facts before us, we are prepared to inquire into the significance of the two horns which pertain to this beast. Why does John say that he has “two horns like a lamb”? Why not simply “two horns”? It must be because these horns possess peculiarities which indicate the character of the power to which they belong. The horns of a lamb indicate, first, youthfulness, and secondly, innocence and gentleness. As a power which has but recently arisen, the United States answers to the symbol admirably in respect to age; while no other power, as has already abundantly been proved, can be found to do this. And considered as an index of power and character, it can be decided what constitutes the two horns of the government, if it can be ascertained what is the secret of its strength and power, and what reveals its apparent character, or constitutes its outward profession. The Hon. J.A. Bingham gives us the clue to the whole matter when he states that the object of those who first sought these shores was to found “what the world had not seen for ages; viz., a Church without a pope, and a State without a king.” Expressed in other words, this would be a government in which the church should be free from the civil power, and civil and religious liberty reign supreme.MANA 132.5

    And what is the profession of this government in these respects? As already noticed, that great instrument which our forefathers set forth as their bill of rights — the Declaration of Independence — affirms that all men are created on a plane of perfect equality; that their Creator has endowed them all alike with certain rights which cannot be alienated from them; that among these are life, of which no man can rightfully deprive another, and liberty, to which every one is alike entitled, and the pursuit of happiness, in any way and every way which does not infringe upon the rights of others.MANA 133.1

    So much for the department of civil liberty. In the domain of spiritual things the position of this government is no less explicit and no less broad and liberal. In the Old World what multitudes have been deprived of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,“ on account of a peculiarity of belief in religious matters! What woes have been inflicted upon the humanity by the efforts of spiritual tyrants to fetter men’s consciences! What a grand safeguard is erected against these evils in the noble provisions of our Constitution, that no person shall be prohibited from freely exercising his religion (on the implied condition, of course, that no other person’s rights are infringed upon); that Congress shall make no law in regard to any religious establishment; and that no religious profession shall qualify, and no lack of it debar, a person from any office of public trust under the United States. Thus the right of worshiping God according to the dictates of his own conscience is guaranteed to every man.MANA 133.2

    In the chapter on the political and religious influence of this nation, these points are brought out more fully. And to the matter of that chapter the reader is again referred.MANA 134.1

    Here, then, are two great principles standing prominently before the people, — Republicanism and Protestantism. And what can be more just, and innocent, and lamb-like than these? And here, also, is the secret of our strength and power. Had some Caligula or Nero ruled this land, we should look in vain for what we behold to-day. Immigration would not have flowed to our shores, and this country would never have presented to the world so unparalleled an example of national growth.MANA 134.2

    One of these two lamb-like horns may therefore represent the great principle of civil liberty in this government; and the other, the equally great principle of religious liberty, which men so highly prize, and have so earnestly sought. As says Mr. Foss in his sermon before quoted, “The two evangels of civil and religious liberty are ours,” How better could these two great principles be symbolized than by the horns of a lamb? This application is warranted by the facts already set forth respecting the horns of the other powers. For (1.) the two horns may belong to one beast, and denote union instead of division, as in the case of the ram (Daniel 8); (2.) a horn may denote a purely ecclesiastical element, as the little horn of Daniel’s fourth beast; and (3.) a horn may denote the civil power alone, as in the case of the first horn of the Grecian goat. On the basis of these facts, we have these two elements, Republicanism and Protestantism, here united in one government, and represented by two horns like the horns of a lamb. And these are nowhere else to be found; nor have they appeared, since the time when we could consistently look for the rise of the two-horned beast, in any nation upon the face of the earth except our own.MANA 134.3

    And with these horns there is no objection to be found. They are like those of a lamb, the Bible symbol of purity and innocence. The principles are all right. The outward appearance is unqualifiedly good. But, alas for our country! its acts are to give the lie to its profession. The lamb-like features are first developed, but the dragon voice is to be heard hereafter.MANA 135.1

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