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    WONDERS

    “And he doeth great wonders,” etc., verse 13.FT 62.3

    It cannot be denied that the United States’ inventions are more wonderful than those of any other nation. It is stated that, “At the World’s Fair in London, the United States were brought into a position among the nations and obtained a name which far excels all her former reputation.”FT 62.4

    The Dublin Nation speaking of the United States, says:FT 62.5

    “In the west an opposing and still more WONDERFUL American empire is emerging. We Islanders have no conception of the extraordinary events, which, amid the silence of earth, are daily adding to the power and pride of this gigantic nation.”FT 62.6

    “Men of America—men of the age.—The greatest man, ‘take him all in all,’ of the last hundred years was George Washington—an American. The greatest philosopher was Benj. Franklin—an American. The greatest living sculptor is Hiram Powers—an American. The greatest living historian is William H. Prescott—an American. The greatest ornithologist was J. J. Audubon—an American. The greatest lexicographer since the time of Johnson was Noah Webster—an American. The greatest inventors of modern times were Fulton, Fitch, Whitney, and Morse—all Americans.”FT 62.7

    A scientific gentleman, on improvements says:FT 63.1

    “There has been no period since the commencement of the world, in which so many important discoveries, tending to the benefit of mankind, were made, as in the last half century. Some of the most wonderful results of human intellect have been witnessed in the last fifty years. Some of the grandest conceptions of genius have been perfected.”FT 63.2

    A late speaker said:FT 63.3

    “If Benjamin Franklin tamed the lightning, Prof. Morse taught it the English language.”FT 63.4

    Dr. JOHN PIERPOINT, writing upon the telegraph, concludes thus:FT 63.5

    A hero chieftain laying down his pen,
    Closes his eyes in Washington at ten;
    The lightning courier leaps along the line,
    And at St. Louis tells the tale at nine;
    Halting a thousand miles whence he departed,
    And getting there an hour before he started.
    FT 63.6

    “The longest railroad in the world is the Illinois Central, which is 731 miles long, and cost fifteen millions of dollars.FT 63.7

    “The greatest number of clocks in the world are turned out by Connecticut. The greatest aqueduct is ‘Croton,’ forty and one-half miles long, and cost twelve millions of dollars.FT 63.8

    “We ascertain by the census of 1850 that the entire number of periodicals of all classes, in the United States, were 2,615, with an aggregate yearly circulation of 425,553,200.”FT 63.9

    Mr. H. R. HELPER, Sir:—FT 64.1

    “In answer to your inquiry, we inform you that we employ in our building one hundred and seventy-six persons regularly; this does not include our carriers and cartmen, nor does it include the men employed in the Job Office in our building. During the past year we have used in printing the Tribune 44,979 reams of paper, weighing 2,310, 130 pounds. We publish one hundred and seventy-six thousands copies of our weekly edition, which goes to press, the second form, at 7 1/2 o’clock, A. M., and is finished at 2 A. M., the next morning.—Our mailers require eighteen to nineteen hours to mail our weekly, which makes from thirty to thirty-two cart loads.” GREELEY & McELRATH.FT 64.2

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