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    RULE OF CUSTOM

    “Custom is defined the unwritten law. In order the custom should obtain the force and obligation of law, three things are required. 1st, That it be introduced not by any particular person, but by a whole community. In the beginning all those persons who introduce custom contrary to law, sin. In process of time, those who follow a custom that has already been introduced by their ancestors, do not commit a sin in following the custom. In order that custom should obtain the force and obligation of law, it is required that it should continue a long time with repeated acts. In regard to the length of time sufficient to render a custom lawful, one opinion is, that it is to be left to the judgement of the prudent, according to the repetition of the acts, and the quality of the matter. The second opinion is, that ten years are required, and are sufficient.” “Merchandizing, and selling of goods at auction on the Sundays, on account of its being the general custom, altogether lawful. Buying and selling goods on the Lord’s day and on other festival days, is certainly forbidden by the canonical law, but where the contrary custom prevails, it is excusable.” St. Ligori Id. ib. N. 107.FT 94.6

    Sunday-keeping of heathen origin. The AM. S. S. Union says:FT 95.1

    Sunday was a name given by the heathen to the first day of the week, because it was the day on which they worshipped the sun.” Bible Dictionary.FT 95.2

    DR. TUBERVILLE says:FT 95.3

    “It is also called Sunday from the old Roman denomination of Dies Solis, the day of the sun, to which it was sacred.” Douay Catechism.FT 95.4

    “To call it Sunday, is to set our wisdom before the wisdom of God, and to give that glory to a pagan idol which is due to him alone. The ancient Saxons called it by this name, because upon it they worshipped the sun.” Religious Ency. Art. Sunday.FT 95.5

    “The heathen nations in the north of Europe dedicated this day to the sun, and hence their Christians descendants continue to call the day Sunday.” Webster Dictionary.FT 96.1

    MILMAN says:FT 96.2

    “The earlier laws of Constantine, though in their efforts favorable to Christianity, claimed some deference, as it were, to the ancient religion in the ambiguity of their language, and cautions terms in which they interfered with the liberty of Paganism. The rescript commanding the celebration of the Christian Sabbath, bears no allusion to its peculiar sanctity as a Christian institution. It is the day of the sun, etc... But the believer in the new Paganism, of which the solar worship was the characteristic, might acquiesce without scruple in the sanctity of the first day of the week.” Hist. of Christianity, p. 289.FT 96.3

    Our Sunday takes its name from the bright sun,FT 96.4

    By heathens called the God of light and day;
    At this approach the morning has begun,
    Rejoicing nature, glories in his ray.”
    FT 96.5

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