Loading...
Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents

From Eternity Past

 - Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "undefined".
  • Weighted Relevancy
  • Content Sequence
  • Relevancy
  • Earliest First
  • Latest First
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    A Dim Reflection of Heavenly Glory

    No language can describe the glory within the sanctuary. The gold-plated walls reflecting light from the golden candlestick; the table, and altar of incense, glittering with gold; beyond the second veil the sacred ark, and above it the holy Shekinah, the manifestation of Jehovah's presence—all were but a dim reflection of the glories of the temple of God in heaven, the great center of the work for man's redemption.EP 242.3

    About half a year was occupied in building the tabernacle. When it was completed, Moses examined all the work of the builders. “As the Lord had commanded, even so had they done it: and Moses blessed them.” The multitude of Israel crowded around to look upon the sacred structure. The pillar of cloud floated over the sanctuary, and “the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle.” There was a revealing of the divine majesty, and for a time even Moses could not enter. With deep emotion the people beheld the token that the work of their hands was accepted. A solemn awe rested upon all. The gladness of their hearts welled up in tears of joy. God had condescended to abide with them.EP 242.4

    In the days of Abraham, the priesthood was the birthright of the eldest son. Now, instead of the first-born, the Lord accepted the tribe of Levi for the work of the sanctuary. However, Aaron and his sons alone were permitted to minister before the Lord; the rest of the tribe were entrusted with the charge of the tabernacle and its furniture.EP 242.5

    A special dress was appointed for the priests. The robe of the common priest was of white linen, woven in one piece, confined about the waist by a white linen girdle embroidered in blue, purple, and red. A linen turban or miter completed his outer costume. The priests were to leave their shoes in the court before entering the sanctuary, and also to wash both their hands and feet before ministering in the tabernacle. Thus was taught the lesson that all defilement must be put away from those who would approach the presence of God.EP 243.1

    The garments of the high priest were of costly material and beautiful workmanship. In addition to the linen dress of the common priest, he wore a robe of blue, also woven in one piece. Around the skirt it was ornamented with golden bells, and pomegranates of blue, purple, and scarlet. The ephod, a shorter garment, was confined by a girdle of the same colors. The ephod was sleeveless, and on its shoulder pieces were set two onyx stones bearing the names of the twelve tribes of Israel.EP 243.2

    Over the ephod was the breastplate in the form of a square, suspended from the shoulders by a cord of blue. The border was formed of a variety of precious stones, the same that form the twelve foundations of the City of God. The Lord's direction was, “Aaron shall bear the names of the children of Israel in the breastplate of judgment upon his heart, when he goeth in unto the holy place, for a memorial before the Lord continually.” Exodus 28:29. So Christ, the great High Priest, pleading His blood in the sinner's behalf, bears upon His heart the name of every repentant, believing soul.EP 243.3

    At the right and left of the breastplate were two large stones known as the Urim and Thummim. When questions were brought before the Lord, a halo of light encircling the stone at the right was a token of divine approval, while a cloud shadowing the stone at the left was evidence of denial.EP 243.4

    Everything connected with the apparel and deportment of the priests was to impress the beholder with the holiness of God and the purity required of those who came into His presence.EP 244.1

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents