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Life Sketches of Ellen G. White

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    On the Indiana Camp Ground

    August 9-14, I attended the camp meeting near Kokomo, Ind., accompanied by my daughter-in-law, Mary K. White. My husband found it impossible for him to leave Battle Creek. At this meeting the Lord strengthened me to labor most earnestly. He gave me clearness and power to appeal to the people. As I looked upon the men and women assembled here, noble in appearance and commanding in influence, and compared them with the little company assembled six years before, who were mostly poor and uneducated, I could but exclaim, “What hath the Lord wrought!”LS 221.3

    The refining influence that the truth has upon the life and character of those who receive it, was exemplified very strongly here. While speaking, we asked those to arise who had been addicted to the use of tobacco, but had entirely discontinued its use because of the light they had received through the truth. In response, between thirty-five and forty arose to their feet, ten or twelve of whom were women. We then invited those to rise who had been told by physicians that it would be fatal for them to stop the use of tobacco, because they had become so accustomed to its false stimulus that they would not be able to live without it. In reply, eight persons, whose countenances indicated health of mind and body, arose to their feet. How wonderful is the sanctifying influence which this truth has upon the human life, making staunch temperance men of those who have indulged in tobacco, wine, and other fashionable dissipation.LS 222.1

    On Sunday Elder J. H. Waggoner spoke with great freedom in the forenoon to a good congregation, on the subject of the Sabbath. Three excursion trains poured their living freight upon the grounds. The people here were very enthusiastic on the temperance question. At 2:30 P.M. I spoke to about eight thousand people on the subject of temperance viewed from a moral and Christian standpoint. I was blessed with remarkable clearness and liberty, and was heard with the best of attention from the large audience present.LS 222.2

    We left the beaten track of the popular lecturer, and traced the origin of the prevailing intemperance to the home, the family board, and the indulgence of appetite in the child. Stimulating food creates a desire for still stronger stimulants. The boy whose taste is thus vitiated, and who is not taught self-control, is the drunkard or tobacco slave of later years. The duty of parents was pointed out to train their children to right views of life and its responsibilities, and to lay the foundation for their upright Christian characters. The great work of temperance reform, to be thoroughly successful, must begin in the home.LS 222.3

    In the evening Elder Waggoner spoke upon the signs of the times, to a large and attentive audience. Many remarked that this discourse, and his sermon upon the Sabbath, had awakened new thoughts in their minds, and that they were determined to investigate these subjects.LS 224.1

    Monday I appealed to the people to give their hearts to God. About fifty came forward for prayers. The deepest interest was manifested. Fifteen were buried with Christ in baptism as the result of the meeting.LS 224.2

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