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    1909

    February 17, 1909

    The True Higher Education

    EGW

    The price paid for our redemption lays a great obligation upon every believer in Christ. It is their duty to understand what God requires of them, and what he would have them be. The educators of youth should realize the responsibility resting upon them, and should do their best to overcome their defects, whether physical, mental, or moral. They should aim at perfection, that the students may have a correct example. They should be learners every day in the school of Christ, that they may be teachers under the great Teacher. They must become one with him in the work of training minds, before they can be efficient teachers of higher education,—the knowledge of God.NPUGleaner February 17, 1909, par. 1

    God is love. The evil that is in the world comes not from his hands, but from our great adversary, whose work it has ever been to deprave man, and enfeeble and pervert his faculties. But God has not left us in the ruin wrought by the fall. Every facility has been placed in reach by our heavenly Father, that men may, through well-directed efforts, regain their perfection, and stand complete in Christ.NPUGleaner February 17, 1909, par. 2

    All the plan of redemption is expressed in those precious words, “God so loved the world that he gave his only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” The human family cost God and his Son Jesus Christ an infinite price. Christ actually bore the punishment of the sins of the world that his righteousness might be imputed to sinners, and that through repentance and faith they might become like him in holiness of character. He says of the repentant soul: “I bear the guilt of that man's sins. Let me take the punishment, and let the repentant sinner stand before Thee innocent.” The moment the sinner believes in Christ, he stands in the sight of God uncondemned; for the righteousness of Christ is his; Christ's perfect obedience is imputed to him.NPUGleaner February 17, 1909, par. 3

    The ransom paid by Christ is sufficient for the salvation of all men; but it will avail for only those who become new creatures in Christ Jesus, loyal subjects of God's everlasting kingdom. His suffering will not shield from punishment the unrepenting, disloyal sinner. Man must co-operate with divine power, and put forth his human effort to subdue sin, and to stand complete in Christ. Christ's work was to restore man to his original state, to heal him, through divine power. Man's part is to lay hold by faith of the merits of Christ, and co-operate with the divine agencies in forming a righteous character. It was thus that God could save the sinner, and yet be just and his righteous law be vindicated.NPUGleaner February 17, 1909, par. 4

    The true higher education makes the student acquainted with God and his Word, and fits him for eternal life. It was to place this life within our reach that Christ gave himself an offering for sin. His purpose of love and mercy is expressed in his prayer for his disciples: “Father, the hour is come; glorify thy Son, that thy Son also may glorify thee; as thou hast given him power over all flesh, that he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given him. And this is life eternal, that they might know thee, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom thou hast sent.”NPUGleaner February 17, 1909, par. 5

    Jesus continues, expressing his care for his own: “And now I am no more in the world, but these are in the world; and I come to thee. Holy Father, keep through thine own name those whom thou hast given me, that they may be one, as we are. While I was with them in the world, I kept them in thy name; those that thou gavest me I have kept, and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition; that the scripture may be fulfilled. And now I come to thee; and these things I speak to the world, that they may have my joy fulfilled in themselves. I have given them the word; and the world hath hated them, because they are not of the world.”NPUGleaner February 17, 1909, par. 6

    Christ here shows what methods he used to keep his disciples from worldly practices, maxims, and dispositions; “I have given them thy word; and the world hath hated them, because they are not of the world.” Their actions, their words, their spirit, are not in harmony with the world. And the Saviour adds: “I pray not that thou shouldst take them out of the world, but that thou shouldst keep them from the evil.” Let us catch the spirit that is breathed in this prayer. The children and youth should receive an education in the line that Christ has here indicated. The Word of God should be made the great educating power.NPUGleaner February 17, 1909, par. 7

    “Sanctify them through thy truth; thy Word is truth,” the Saviour prayed. How shall students know the truth, except by a close, earnest, persevering study of the Word? Here is the grand stimulus, the hidden force, that quickens the mental and physical powers, and directs the life into right channels. Here is wisdom, history, biography, poetry, and the most profound philosophy. Here is a lesson book of heavenly origin that will stimulate the mind into a vigorous and healthy life, and awaken it to the highest exercise. It is impossible to study the Word with a humble, teachable spirit without developing and strengthening the intellect. Those who become best acquainted with the wisdom and purpose of God as revealed in his word become men and women of mental strength; and they may become efficient workers with the great Educator, Jesus Christ.NPUGleaner February 17, 1909, par. 8

    “And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also may be sanctified through the truth.” Teachers may suppose that they can teach in their own wisdom, retaining their human imperfections, but Christ, the divine Teacher, sanctified himself for his work. He offered himself to God as a sacrifice for sin, giving his life for the life of the world. He would have those for whom he has paid such a ransom “sanctified through the truth,” and he has set them the example. The Teacher is what he would have his disciples become.NPUGleaner February 17, 1909, par. 9

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