Loading...
Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents

The Ellen G. White Writings

 - Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "undefined".
  • Weighted Relevancy
  • Content Sequence
  • Relevancy
  • Earliest First
  • Latest First
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    The Bible Prophets and the Question of Influence

    The suggestion that the prophets were influenced by others is nothing new in the history of inspiration. The scriptures in Jeremiah 43:1-3 bring to us just such a picture. Jeremiah was the Lord’s messenger to Judah. He had borne a solemn message to the leaders of Judah.EGWW 82.1

    Note the words: “And it came to pass when Jeremiah had made an end of speaking unto all the people all the words of the Lord their God, for which the Lord their God had sent him to them, even all these words, then spake Azariah the son of Hoshaiah, and Johanan the son of Kareah, and all the proud men, saying unto Jeremiah, Thou speakest falsely: the Lord our God hath not sent thee to say, Go not into Egypt to sojourn there: but Baruch the son of Neriah setteth thee on against us, for to deliver us into the hand of the Chaldeans.”EGWW 82.2

    Jeremiah had borne Heaven’s message to the people. One of the leaders got up and said, “Jeremiah, you are a liar. Baruch, your secretary, wanted you to say that, and you said it. God never gave you the message.” History, however, made clear that the message came from God.EGWW 82.3

    There is another interesting story that has a bearing on this topic, found in 2 Chronicles 18. We find Jehoshaphat was king of Judah and Ahab king of Israel. Jehoshaphat was a man of God, Ahab was not. A marriage between the families had taken place, and an alliance between the two kingdoms was formed. Jehoshaphat should not have permitted this, but he had. There came a day when there was to be a family reunion in Samaria, and Jehoshaphat took his family and went over to Samaria, and took part of his army along for review and all that goes with kingly visits.EGWW 82.4

    Ahab thought this would be a good time to go out and fight his enemies, for with Jehoshaphat in Samaria, he had some reinforcements. He proposed to Jehoshaphat that they go up and fight his enemies. Without first seeking divine guidance, Jehoshaphat replied, “I am as thou art, and my people as thy people; and we will be with thee in the war.”EGWW 83.1

    But then Jehoshaphat thought better of it and said to Ahab: “Enquire, I pray thee, at the word of the Lord to day” (verse 4). So Ahab called in his 400 prophets. They knew what kind of answer Ahab wanted, and they said, “Go up; for God will deliver it [Ramoth-gilead] into the king’s hand.”EGWW 83.2

    Jehoshaphat knew that these men were false prophets, so he turned to Ahab and said, “Is there not here a prophet of the Lord besides, that we might enquire of him?” (verse 6). And the king of Israel said unto Jehoshaphat, “There is yet one man, by whom we may enquire of the Lord: but I hate him; for he never prophesied good unto me, but always evil: the same is Micaiah the son of Imla. And Jehoshaphat said, Let not the king say so.” Jehoshaphat evidently made it clear to Ahab that he would get nowhere with his enterprise without hearing from Micaiah first. So an officer was called and sent to Micaiah’s home to summon him to come and prophesy concerning the proposed expedition.EGWW 83.3

    The messenger who went to call Micaiah knew the answer that had been given by the 400 false prophets. He knew his master, and he knew that if Micaiah was unwise enough to prophesy disaster to Ahab’s enterprise, he would probably lose his head. Thinking to do Micaiah a kindness, the officer advised him to give Ahab a favorable reply. But Micaiah fearlessly replied, “As the Lord liveth, even what my God saith, that will I speak” (verse 13).EGWW 83.4

    It made no difference to Micaiah what his reply might mean to him personally. There was only one answer he could give when he went before the king. There were a few bantering words of introduction, and then Micaiah predicted disaster to the enterprise and death to King Ahab. At this Ahab turned to Jehoshaphat and said, “Didn’t I tell you he would prophesy evil and not good? Officer, take Micaiah. Put him in the dungeon, feed him bread and water till I come back victorious.” But Ahab never came back. He died on the battlefield that day. The point is, God’s prophets were not influenced.EGWW 84.1

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents