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The Ellen G. White Writings

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    How the Light Came to the Prophet

    The many different ways in which the light was imparted to the prophet is a study having a bearing on this presentation, but is too extended for this book, except for one later allusion. See Messenger to the Remnant, pages 9-11, for illustrations.EGWW 19.5

    A summary of this chapter reveals that light came to Ellen White—EGWW 19.6

    1. In visions in which she was seemingly present and participating in the events she was viewing.EGWW 19.7

    2. In broad panoramic views such as when the events of history past and future passed before her.EGWW 19.8

    3. Viewing events with the angel standing by her side explaining the significance of the scenes.EGWW 19.9

    4. As seemingly she visited institutions, meetings in session, and families in their homes, hearing all that was said and seeing all that was done.EGWW 19.10

    5. As she was shown institutional buildings which had not yet been erected and then was given instruction covering the work to be done in these institutions.EGWW 19.11

    6. In symbolic representations, usually explained by the angel.EGWW 20.1

    7. In contrasting views in which two situations were opened to her, neither of which had taken place, with an explanation of the results in each case.EGWW 20.2

    So much for the vision—the process, first, by which the prophet received from God light through which his mind was enlightened.EGWW 20.3

    The second process was the bearing of testimony of what had been revealed in vision. Having been received, the message must be imparted by the prophet in the best way and with the most accurate language at the prophet’s command in an attempt to create in the mind of the recipient the thought, the idea, the picture contained in the message.EGWW 20.4

    The prophet at one time might use certain words and at another time employ other words in conveying the same message. He might have at ready command words that would convey the message satisfactorily, or he might find it necessary to study diligently to find words adequate to convey the message correctly and impressively. While writing The Desire of Ages, Mrs. White declared: “I tremble for fear lest I shall belittle the great plan of salvation by cheap words.” Letter 40, 1892 (quoted in Messenger to the Remnant, p. 59). The transmission of the message might suffer some impairment because of the inadequacy of the prophet. Note this comment by Ellen G. White:EGWW 20.5

    The Bible ... was written by human hands; and in the varied style of its different books it presents the characteristics of the several writers. The truths revealed are all “given by inspiration of God” (2 Timothy 3:16); yet they are expressed in the words of men. The Infinite One by His Holy Spirit has shed light into the minds and hearts of His servants. He has given dreams and visions, symbols and figures; and those to whom the truth was thus revealed have themselves embodied the thought in human language....EGWW 20.6

    Written in different ages, by men who differed widely in rank and occupation, and in mental and spiritual endowments, the books of the Bible present a wide contrast in style, as well as a diversity in the nature of the subjects unfolded. Different forms of expression are employed by different writers; often the same truth is more strikingly presented by one than by another....EGWW 21.1

    As presented through different individuals, the truth is brought out in its varied aspects. One writer is more strongly impressed with one phase of the subject; he grasps those points that harmonize with his experience or with his power of perception and appreciation; another seizes upon a different phase; and each, under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, presents what is most forcibly impressed upon his own mind—a different aspect of the truth in each, but a perfect harmony through all. And the truths thus revealed unite to form a perfect whole, adapted to meet the wants of men in all the circumstances and experiences of life.—The Great Controversy, v, vi.EGWW 21.2

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