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The Ellen G. White Writings

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    Ellen G. White Refrained From Certain Reading

    No, Ellen White was not influenced. She was careful not to read certain things. In a letter written in 1887, she declared:EGWW 96.1

    I have not been in the habit of reading any doctrinal articles in the paper, that my mind should not have any understanding of anyone’s ideas and views, so that not a mould of any man’s theories should have any connection with that which I write.—Letter 37, 1887.EGWW 96.2

    Again, from another letter:EGWW 96.3

    Sara [McEnterfer, Ellen White’s traveling companion and private secretary] tells me that she has a letter for me from you, but I tell her not to give it to me yet; for I have something to write to you before I see your letter. You will understand this.—Letter 172, 1902.EGWW 96.4

    Another such experience is recorded in 1905. Writing to a brother she said:EGWW 96.5

    You may blame me for not reading your package of writings. I did not read them, neither did I read the letters that Dr. Kellogg sent. I had a message of stern rebuke for the publishing house, and I knew that if I read the communications sent to me, later on, when the testimony came out, you and Dr. Kellogg would be tempted to say, “I gave her that inspiration.” Letter 301, 1905.EGWW 96.6

    This experience makes it clear that Ellen White refrained from reading what might be thought to influence her.EGWW 96.7

    In Special Testimonies to the Review and Herald Office she wrote in 1896:EGWW 96.8

    Unbelief is expressed by the words “Who has written these things to Sister White?” But I know of no one who knows them as they are, and no one could write that which he does not suppose has an existence. Some one has told me,—He who does not falsify, misjudge, or exaggerate any case.—Page 16.EGWW 96.9

    Again in 1903 she wrote:EGWW 97.1

    Some, in their self-confidence, have dared to turn from that which they knew to be truth, with the words, “Who has told Sister White?” These words show the measure of their faith and confidence in the work the Lord has given me to do.—The Review and Herald, May 19, 1903.EGWW 97.2

    At another time she wrote:EGWW 97.3

    Some are ready to inquire: Who told Sister White these things? They have even put the question to me: Did anyone tell you these things? I could answer them: Yes; yes, the angel of God has spoken to me. But what they mean is: Have the brethren and sisters been exposing their faults?—Testimonies for the Church 3:314, 315.EGWW 97.4

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