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    October 16, 1884

    “Question and Answer” The Signs of the Times 10, 39, p. 611.

    IN the first verse of Revelation 21, are we to understand that there is literally to be “no more sea,” in the earth made new? J. C. H.SITI October 16, 1884, page 611.1

    ANSWER.—We think not. You will see by Revelation 20:11, that the heaven and the earth fled away from the face of him who sat on the great white throne, “and there was no place found for them;” they were no more. In the verse to which you refer this is stated again, but in contrast with the new heaven and new earth. “I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away; and there was no more sea.” In other words, the first heaven and the first earth were no more; the sea also passed away and was no more. And as there is to be a new heaven and a new earth, it is only reasonable to suppose that there will be a new sea. Especially as we read of the river of life and that its waters go “down into the plain, and go into the sea.” Ezekiel 47:8. Besides this, that we read in Isaiah 35:6 of the new earth; “in the wilderness shall water break out and streams in the desert.” Now if there shall be rivers and streams flowing through the new earth, it is only natural to suppose that there is some place to which they flow, and that place a new sea.SITI October 16, 1884, page 611.2

    More than this, when God made the heaven and the earth, in the beginning, he also said: “Let the waters be gathered together unto one place; ... and the gathering together of the waters called he seas.” Genesis 1:9, 10. Now if there had never been any sin on the earth, certainly this sea would have remained as long as the earth and its paradise remained, which of course would have been for ever and ever. But sin entered, and grew so great that the flood came, and by that the quantity of water was greatly increased upon the earth, because the “windows of heaven were opened,” and the fountains of the great deep were broken up. Genesis 7:11. In 2 Esdras 6:42 we have a hint of what the ancients thought of this; “upon the third day thou didst command that the waters should be gathered in the seventh part of the earth.”SITI October 16, 1884, page 611.3

    And so when “the earth and the heaven” because of sin shall flee away from the face of him who shall sit upon the great white throne, then this sea, which has been so greatly increased because of sin, will also flee away with them, and like them there will be found no place for it; it will be no more. Then when he who sits upon the throne says: “Behold I make all things new,” the sea must be made new or it will not be true that he makes all things new. And so there will be not only a new heaven and a new earth, but a new sea also. All new.SITI October 16, 1884, page 611.4

    Therefore we conclude that when John says, “and there was no more sea,” he has reference exclusively to that sea that belongs with the earth and the heaven which she had just seen flee away, and for which no place was found.SITI October 16, 1884, page 611.5

    Dr. Clarke says on this passage: “The sea no more appeared then did the first heaven and earth. All was made new.”SITI October 16, 1884, page 611.6

    The “Bible Commentary” says: “(2) The former ‘sea’ has passed away like the former ‘earth,’ but this does not preclude a ‘new’ sea, any more than a new ‘earth.’”SITI October 16, 1884, page 611.7

    A. T. JONES.

    “Healdsburg College” The Signs of the Times 10, 39, p. 623.

    BEING at Healdsburg College, on business, October 6 and 7, I took occasion to visit the College and the Students’ Home. At the college I found more than ninety pupils, ranging from childhood to middle age, earnestly engaged in their studies, guided by a corp of seven teachers, besides the principal, Professor Brownsberger. I visited every room and listened to the recitations, all of which were very interesting; but that which impressed me most was the deep interest taken by the teachers. It seemed to be their greatest care that every one in the class should thoroughly understand the lesson. If there was anything that any one did not see clearly, he would state it frankly, then the teacher would take it up and go over it again, and even again and again, enlarging, and illustrating until every part of the lesson was made perfectly plain to every one. And all done with the most cheerful kindness; no sign of impatience, no censure. It is inconceivable that any one should go to school there without learning well and thoroughly everything that he studies.SITI October 16, 1884, page 623.1

    At night I had the pleasure of enjoying the hospitality of the Students’ Home. I do not say “boarding-house,” for that would be a misnomer applied here. It was indeed a pleasure. Everything so tidy and in such perfect order; everything done with such cheerful alacrity; all tends to give that peaceful, pleasant, home influence which is really soothing and restful, and by which one feels that the blessing of God, and his angels abide there. Nearly fifty of the students dwell at the “home,” and every one seemed to be entirely satisfied with the place and the surroundings. Indeed I cannot see how it could be otherwise. Every dwelling-room is nicely carpeted and nicely furnished, the table abundantly supplied with the very best of food, and that well-cooked. In truth nothing short of a first-class hotel could equal the accommodations, and nothing short of a first-class home in every sense of the word could equal the influence of the Students’ Home.SITI October 16, 1884, page 623.2

    And I would say to Seventh-day Adventist parents on all the Pacific Coast, who have children to send to school, Don’t fail to send them to Healdsburg College, and have them dwell at the Students’ Home. Some will probably say, “The expense is so much more than at the public school at home.” Admitting that the expense is somewhat more, it is absolutely true that the benefits are infinitely greater. So send them along. And to Seventh-day Adventists on the coast, who have not children to send, as well as all those who have, let not your hands be slacking furnishing means to the institution, that it may never lacking in its splendid efficiency. He who will be a friend of the Healdsburg College is the friend of the Third Angel’s Message.SITI October 16, 1884, page 623.3

    ALONZO T. JONES.

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