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    WOMEN AS PROPHETS

    In Old Testament times the Lord not only used men as prophets, but also devout women were favored with this gift. In the days of the judges of Israel we have the record of Deborah the prophetess, the wife of Lapi-doth, who was not only a prophetess, but served in the position of judge. Through instructions given by her, their enemies were overthrown, as seen in Judges 4:4; 5:31. Then again mention is made of Huldah the prophetess, the wife of Shallum, the son of Tikvah, in the days of Josiah, the good king of Judah. She seems to have been connected with the school at Jerusalem, and was sought unto for counsel, as recorded in 2 Kings 22:13-20; 2 Chronicles 34:22-28.SGL 8.3

    Satan, seeking to mar the work of the Lord, in olden times sometimes used for false prophets women as well as men. Of these women agents, and their flattering, soothsaying work, sewing pillows to armholes of statues to hunt souls, etc., a graphic description is found in Ezekiel 13:17-23.SGL 9.1

    At the same time the Saviour was taken to the temple to have made for Him the required offering, the devoted Simeon recognized Him as the promised Messiah. And there was also present upon that occasion Anna, a prophetess, who dwelt in the temple-probably in the “college,” or “school,” as did Huldah. Thus it is evident that when Peter on the day of Pentecost-in harmony with Joel’s prophecy-declared that as a result of the outpouring of the Spirit, the “handmaidens” and daughters” should prophesy, it was not a strange thing to the church to learn that women should share in the prophetic gift in the Gospel age.SGL 9.2

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