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    KINGDOM OF GLORY

    It will appear evident that the word kingdom in many cases refers to the future immortal kingdom, and cannot be applied to the means of grace. That the immortal kingdom was not set up at certain periods spoken of in the New Testament, will appear by referring to some of those Scripture expressions which apply to the future kingdom of glory. It was not set up when our Lord taught his disciples to pray, “Thy kingdom come.” Matthew 6:10. The prophets, Christ, and the apostles, all point the church forward to the coming and kingdom of Christ as the time of the consummation of her faith and hope, the end of her toils and sorrows, and the fullness of her joys. Hence, in the pattern prayer for the Christian church of all ages is the petition, “Thy kingdom come.”BIAD 89.1

    The mother of Zebedee’s children understood the kingdom to be future when she desired our Lord to grant that her two sons might sit, “the one on the right hand, and the other on the left,” in his kingdom. Matthew 20:20, 21.BIAD 89.2

    Again, the kingdom was still future when our Lord ate the last passover with the twelve. He said to them, “I say unto you, I will not drink of the fruit of the vine, until the kingdom of God shall come.” Luke 22:18.BIAD 89.3

    But did Christ set up the kingdom before his ascension to Heaven? Just before his ascension, the disciples inquired, “Lord, wilt thou at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?” It was not then set up.BIAD 90.1

    When James wrote his epistle, the immortal kingdom was yet a matter of promise. He says: “Hearken, my beloved brethren, hath not God chosen the poor of this world, rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom which he hath promised to them that love him?” James 2:5.BIAD 90.2

    Both Jesus and Paul associate the kingdom with the second advent. Jesus addresses those who are waiting for his coming and kingdom, thus: “Let your loins be girded about, and your lights burning; and ye yourselves like unto men that wait for their lord, when he will return from the wedding; that, when he cometh and knocketh, they may open unto him immediately.” Luke 12:35, 36. In this connection he comforts his people with these precious words: “Fear not, little flock; for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom.” Verse 32. Paul solemnly charges Timothy: “I charge thee therefore before God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, who shall judge the quick and the dead at his appearing and his kingdom.” 2 Timothy 4:1. The apostle also states that “we must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God.” Acts 14:22. This address was made to those who were already Christians, yet they were not in the kingdom. The immortal kingdom is the reward to be given to all who march boldly on through tribulation here. And again he says, “Flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God.” 1 Corinthians 15:50. This settles the question that there is a kingdom not to be enjoyed by the saints till they put on immortality, or till they enter the immortal state, which the apostle says, verse 52, is “at the last trump.”BIAD 90.3

    The miniature exhibition of the kingdom of God at the transfiguration is designed to show the nature of the kingdom, and when it will be set up. “For the Son of Man shall come in the glory of his Father, with his angels; and then he shall reward every man according to his works. Verily I say unto you, There be some standing here, which shall not taste of death, till they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom.” Matthew 16:27, 28. “Till they see the kingdom of God.” Luke 9:27.BIAD 91.1

    This promise was shortly fulfilled on the mount. “And after six days, Jesus taketh Peter, James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into an high mountain apart, and was transfigured before them; and his face did shine as the sun, and his raiment was white as the light. And behold, there appeared unto them Moses and Elias talking with him. Then answered Peter, and said unto Jesus, Lord, it is good for us to be here. If thou wilt, let us make here three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. While he yet spake, behold, a bright cloud overshadowed them; and behold, a voice out of the cloud, which said, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye him.” Matthew 17:1-5. Notice the following points:BIAD 91.2

    1. Jesus Christ appeared there in his own personal glory. His countenance shone like the sun, and his raiment was white as the light.BIAD 91.3

    2. The glory of the Father was there. It was a “bright cloud” of the divine glory, out of which came the Father’s voice.BIAD 91.4

    3. Moses and Elias appeared; the one, the representative of those saints who shall be raised at Christ’s coming, and clothed with glory; the other, Elias, the representative of those who will be alive and be changed at the appearing of Christ.BIAD 91.5

    4. The use the apostles made of the scene. Peter was one of the witnesses; and in view of the importance of the kingdom of Christ, he, in his second epistle, has given believers of all coming ages instruction how they may insure an abundant entrance “into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ.” “For we have not followed cunningly-devised fables when we made known unto you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but were eye-witnesses of his majesty.” This, he says, was “when we were with him in the holy mount.” 2 Peter 1:16-18. This scene was a demonstration of Christ’s second, personal, and glorious, coming, and shows that the kingdom will be immortal when set up, and that it will be set up at the period of the second advent, and resurrection of the just.BIAD 92.1

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