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    September 1905

    “Why the Japanese Succeed,” The Medical Missionary 14, 9.

    EJW

    E. J. Waggoner

    One reason, which has been much exploited, is that they pay strict attention to personal hygiene, and that they live simply. That is no small factor in the success of the Japanese in whatever they undertake; but it is not the only one. A study of the precepts which have been instilled into their minds by their teachers reveals the fact that, although nominally heathen, they have some practical Christianity of which so-called Christian nations are largely destitute. One notable feature is that they do not boast of their future either of what they intend to do, or of what they have done. Nothing is surer than that boasting is excluded from all really successful work, from all work that is thorough and lasting. Other things being equal, the boaster is far more likely to fail than is the man who silently goes about his task, or who takes hold of it even with fear and trembling.MEDM September 1905, page 281.1

    A note found on the body of a Japanese lieutenant, addressed to “officer or officers of the staff who may survive,” contains some precepts that Christian workers would do well continually to bear in mind. Here are three paragraphs from it:-MEDM September 1905, page 281.2

    “After the war with China, according to my experience, soldiers became too boastful of their achievements. Be modest and retiring.MEDM September 1905, page 281.3

    “Do not act too proudly, lest you should he disliked by the people.MEDM September 1905, page 281.4

    “Man is not God, therefore some injustice may be done you. Do not fight for rewards.”MEDM September 1905, page 281.5

    Here is another precept that was impressed upon the mind of Admiral Togo when he was a youth, and which goes far toward explaining the secret of his present greatness:-MEDM September 1905, page 281.6

    “Where you see faults, take the blame of them yourself: where there is merit, attribute it to others.”MEDM September 1905, page 281.7

    This is but another form of the apostolic injunction: “Let nothing be done through strife or vainglory: but in lowliness of mind let each esteem other better than themselves.” The reputed heathen who lives by this rule will go into the kingdom of heaven before the professed Christian who is neglects it.MEDM September 1905, page 281.8

    E. J. W.

    “‘Tired of Life’,” The Medical Missionary 14, 9.

    EJW

    E. J. Waggoner

    We frequently see or hear the expression, “tired of life,” and many people think that it indicates their condition; but the truth is, that nobody ever was or ever will be tired of life. That which causes weariness and disgust is lack of life. Perfect life is perfect joy, even though tribulations may surround it. It is not to be wondered at that people become tired of the fractional, perverted, unreal lives that they live; but it is not real life that wearies. God would have all men become disgusted with the partial life that they lead, in order that they may accept his fulness of life, which is able to lift its possessor above the griefs and troubles of this present evil world.MEDM September 1905, page 283.1

    “‘Tis life, of which our nerves are scant;
    ‘Tis life, not death, for which we pant;
    More life, and fuller, that we want.”
    E. J. W.
    MEDM September 1905, page 283.2

    “An Incentive to Thoroughness” The Medical Missionary 14, 9.

    EJW

    E. J. Waggoner

    Thoroughness of preparation is one great secret of success in every calling. The greater the responsibility, and the more there is depending on the work in hand, the more necessary it is that one make his preparations for it with conscientious care. The following words, therefore, by Sir James Paget, late Surgeon-Extraordinary to Queen Victoria, in one of his addresses to students, ought to be kept in a conspicuous place by every nurse and medical student:-MEDM September 1905, page 283.3

    “We sometimes see the beam of life and death so nearly balanced that it turns this way or that, according to the skill that may be cast into the scale of life. And surely, if we could gather into thought all the issues that are involved in the life or death of any man. the anxiety of ignorance at such a time would be intolerable. All is permitted to depend upon the skill of one. Conceive that one yourself: what would be your remorse if, when in their confusion and distress they look to you, you felt helpless as themselves; your hand paralyzed by the fear of ignorance, your mind confused in that half-knowledge, whose glimmerings only show that more skill might save the dying man! Yet this must be the remorse of every one who will neglect the study of his profession, and yet dare to undertake its responsibilities.”MEDM September 1905, page 283.4

    In addition to this, keep these words continually in mind: “Whatsoever ye do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus,” and “do it heartily, as to the Lord, and not unto men,” and your mind can be at ease as to results.MEDM September 1905, page 284.1

    E. J. W.

    “Editorial. My Life Work,” The Medical Missionary 14, 9.

    EJW

    E. J. Waggoner

    “How can I know what my life work is?” so many are asking. “How can I know that the work I am doing is that to which the Lord has called me?” There need be no perplexity whatever over this matter. We know that the Lord has given “to every man his work” and we ought to know that he would not do that without giving every man definite instructions as to what his work is. Here is the answer to the questions cited: “Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might.” That is, the work that is nearest at hand is your work-your life work, if you please; for though your work may change with time, it will always be the work that lies close at hand. No matter if it be work that is called inferior to that to which you have been accustomed; no matter if it is work that somebody else ought to do; never mind if there is no promise of pay attached to it;-if you are not engaged in other work, that is your work. The most efficient workers in this world spend much time doing work that somebody else has neglected, and nobody is fit for the highest tasks unless he is willing to perform the lowest. The most perfect master is he who knows best how to serve.MEDM September 1905, page 284.2

    E. J. W.

    “Editorial. The Lord’s Prayer” The Medical Missionary 14, 9.

    EJW

    E. J. Waggoner

    Jesus taught his followers to pray, “Our Father which art in heaven.” Much has been said on the term “Our Father,” as indicating our common brotherhood with our fellow-men; but that which it should above all impress on our minds is the fact that both Jesus and we have one Father. “Our Father” is “the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.” When, therefore, we from the heart, in childlike trustfulness, look up to God and say. Our Father, which art in heaven. ... give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses,” we should remember that the fulfilment of our request is as certain to follow as if made by Jesus Christ in person. We have the same right in the Father’s house and at his table that Jesus has, and the same right to share in the inheritance. If we are children of God, then we are heirs, “heirs of God, and joint heirs with Jesus Christ.”MEDM September 1905, page 285.1

    E. J. W.

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