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    The Roman Era

    The adjustment of this era to the Grecian and Vulgar Eras, is equally demonstrable. Says Dr. Hales:-ASC 22.2

    “1. Censorinus reckoned that the year a d. 238, in which he wrote his work, was the 991st from the foundation of Rome, by the Varronian computation. But 991-a. d. 238 = b. c. 753.-See Petav., tom. ii., pp. 53, 69.ASC 22.3

    “2. Cicero and Plutarch both relate that, on the day of the foundation of Rome, there was a total eclipse of the sun, which happened, according to the latter, in the third year of the sixth Olympiad, b. c. 754-3. But by astronomical calculation, there was an eclipse of the sun visible at Rome, b. c. 753, July 5, aft. 41/2, dig. 4, agreeing in every respect except the quantity. This also adjusts the Grecian and Roman eras together.-See Cicero, de div., lib. ii.; Plutarch in Romulo.ASC 22.4

    “3. Livy records, in the consulate of Livius Salinator and Valerius Messaia, u. c. 566, a total eclipse of the sun, which, by astronomical calculation, happened b. c. 188, July 17, morn. 8h. 38m. dig. 103/4: but the sum of these years gives b. c. 754, complete, or b. c. 753, current.-Livy, lib. xxxviii. 36.ASC 22.5

    “4. Livy also records, that, in the consulate of Paulus Æmilius and Licinius Crassus, u. c. 586, Sulpitius Gallus, a military tribune, predicted an eclipse of the moon, to happen on the ensuing night, from the second to the fourth hour, which accordingly happened the night before the famous battle of Pydna, in which Perseus, king of Macedon, was defeated; and this encouraged the Romans, and dispirited the Macedonians. And, by astronomical calculation, there was an eclipse of the moon, b. c. 168, June 21, which began, aft. 6h. 14m., and lasted four hours; 15 dig. The total immersion, or eclipse, began 7h. 32m., or in the second hour of the night, and lasted till the fourth hour, exactly agreeing with the prediction of Gallus, which identifies the eclipses, and shows considerable skill, on his part, at that early age. It also proves that Livy was incorrect, in assigning the night of the eclipse, ‘pridie nonas Septembris.’ The context, in the preceding chapter, shows that the season of the year was rather about the summer solstice.-Livy, lib.xliv.37. But the sum of these years gives b. c. 754, complete, or b. c. 753, current, for the date of the foundation of Rome, according to the Varronian computation, which is infallibly established by means of these eclipses.”-Hales, vol. i., pp. 249-50.ASC 22.6

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