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    December 15, 1887

    “Plan of Biblical Course for 1888” The Signs of the Times 13, 48, p. 760.

    IT has been thought best that I should say a word in regard to the work contemplated in the Biblical Course the coming quarter.SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.1

    First, we want to make it as profitable as possible to all who attend, whether they have been there before or not. Therefore we expect to give as full a view of the present truth as is possible in the time that we shall have. This work in the regular Bible-class will be carried forward much in the same form as a series of sermons would be in a new place, where it was certain that the minister would remain fifteen weeks. This on the part of the teacher. Then it will be the work of the students to learn to make Bible-readings, following the same course.SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.2

    Secondly, we wish to make this term one of special interest and profit to those who have publicly labored in the cause, or who intend to do so. therefore all thee will form a special class, and in addition to the course named above, will be given: (1) The history of the rise and establishment of the Papacy, and of the formation of the union of Church and State, both in the establishment of the Papacy, and in the making of the image to the Papacy, which is fast approaching in our own country; (2) drill in speaking; (3) drill in writing reports of sermons, and of meetings, and in writing articles for the press; (4) drill in reading, especially in reading the Scriptures, and hymns. In short, it is intended to make this class a school of practice for work in the field, so that when the school term is ended, and the students go into the field to work, they will be simply going on with that which they have been doing in the class. In this class we want to do everything that can be done to profit those who take the course, and to make them efficient in the work to which we hope they have devoted their lives.SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.3

    ALONZO T. JONES.

    “The Place of the Sabbath in the Third Angel’s Message” The Signs of the Times 13, 48, pp. 760, 761.

    WE have shown that the third Angel’s Message alone presents to the world the truth, the love of which is to save men from being deceived by the lying wonders of Satan; that the truth of this message alone will develop in those who receive the Lord of it, the righteousness which will shield them from the “deceivableness of unrighteousness,” which Satan will work “with all power and signs and lying wonders” in them that receive no the love of it. This message calls upon all men to “keep the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus,” while Satan’s whole endeavor is by whatever means he may employ, to keep all people from doing this.SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.1

    Although it is universally true that Satan is engaged always in deceiving men and seducing them from the truth of God on every conceivable point, yet there are in the Third Angel’s Message two main points, above all others, against which all of Satan’s power will be employed, and all his signs and lying wonders will be wrought to deceive men into receiving a counterfeit of each instead of the true, and into believing a lie instead of the truth. These two points are: (1) The Sabbath of the fourth commandment; and (2) the coming of the Lord. Inseparably connected with these main points there are to others; with the first, the obligation of the ten commandments as a whole; and with the second, life and immortality only through faith in Christ. Through opposition to these Satan will largely develop his deceptions, but against the first two points all his power and signs and lying wonders will culminate.SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.2

    That the Sabbath of the fourth commandment is the pivot upon which turns the controversy of the Third Angel’s Message is clear both by the Scripture and by the facts in the case. The three messages of Revelation 14:6-12 are not three distinct and separate messages, so that each one is fully given and past before the next one begins. But rather they are cumulative, the second blending its voice with the first, and the third blending its “loud voice” with the other two, thus making what might be termed a threefold message rather than three distinct messages. Yet they are properly termed first, second, and third, because there is this order in their rise. The first warns of the hour of God’s Judgment come, and calls upon men to worship him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters. Then there follows another, announcing the result of the rejection of the first. And then the third angel follows them, warning against the evil which is developed through the “fall” announced by the second, in consequence of the rejection of the first.SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.3

    The first carries “the everlasting gospel to preach unto them that dwell on the earth, and to every nations, and kindred, and tongue, and people, saying with a loud voice, Fear God, and give glory to him; for the hour of his Judgment is come; and worship him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters.” When this message, which would have healed Babylon, was rejected, then there followed another, saying, “Babylon is fallen, is fallen,” etc. Out of this “fall” there grows the image of the beast and the worship of the beast and his image; therefore “the third angel followed them, saying with a loud voice, If any man worship the beast and his image, and receive his mark in his forehead, or in his hand, the same shall drink of the wine of the wrath of God, which is poured without mixture into the cup of his indignation.” The first angel speaks of the hour of God’s Judgment come. And since “as many as have sinned in the law shall be judged by the law” “in the day when God shall judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ according to my gospel” (Romans 2:12, 16), therefore the third angel follows close upon this, saying, “Here are they that keep the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus.” Keeping the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus will fit men to stand in the Judgment.SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.4

    The first message calls the attention of all men to the Judgment of God, and tells them that its time is come; and the third message follows, telling all men what to do that they may meet the Judgment in peace, that is, “keep the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus.”SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.5

    The first message calls upon men to worship God. They refuse, and are led to worship the beast and his image instead. Then the third angel follows, not only warning against the worship of the beast and his image, but also telling them what they must do to worship God, that is, “keep the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus.”SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.6

    The First Angel’s Message commands men specifically to “worship Him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters.” The Third Angel’s Message calls men specifically to “keep the commandments of God.” Now is there any part of the commandments of God that points specifically to “Him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters”? There is decidedly. Let us read: “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labor, and do all thy work; but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God; in it thou shalt not do any work, ... for in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day, and hallowed it.” Therefore as the first message commands men specifically to “worship Him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters;” and as the third message, following, calls men to keep the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus; and as the fourth commandment, through the Sabbath of the Lord, points specifically to “Him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters;” therefore it is certain that in the time of the Third Angel’s Message every nation and kindred and tongue and people will be called to keep the Sabbath of the Lord, and so to “worship him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters,” and escape the worship of the beast and his image.SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.7

    The keeping of the Sabbath of the Lord—the seventh day—is the sign that those who do so worship the true God. “Hallow my Sabbaths; and they shall be a sign between me and you, that ye may know that I am the Lord.” Ezekiel 20:20. And it is the sign that he is the true God, because it is the sign that he made heaven and earth and all things that are therein. “Wherefore the children of Israel shall keep the Sabbath, to observe the Sabbath throughout their generations, for a perpetual covenant. It is a sign between me and the children of Israel for ever; for in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, and on the seventh day he rested, and was refreshed.” Now as the one great question, above every other, of the Third Angel’s Message is whether men will worship Him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters or whether they will worship the beast and his image; and as the keeping of the Sabbath of the Lord is the sign that those who do keep it do worship Him that made heaven and earth; and as the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord; therefore it certainly follows that the keeping of the seventh day as the Sabbath of the Lord is the one point above every other that distinguishes the worshipers of Him that made heaven and earth from the worshipers of the beast and his image, and is the pivot upon which the Third Angel’s Message turns.SITI December 15, 1887, page 760.8

    So much for the Scripture proofs; now for the proofs from the other side of the controversy.SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.1

    J.

    “Tobacco and Wiskey” The Signs of the Times 13, 48, p. 761.

    THE fiftieth Congress has assembled, and the President has delivered his annual message. As the Government annually receives more money than it knows what to do with, the question how to reduce the surplus in the National Treasury is the principal one before Congress. The President has recommended that the tariff on foreign fabrics be reduced, while the revenue on certain home products, whisky and tobacco for instance, shall be retained. This has made a great stir in our own country, and has caused much favorable comment in England. Upon the question itself, we have nothing particular to say, but Hon. James G. Blaine has made some remarks upon it, about which we have a few words to say. In an interview with Mr. Blaine, the following conversation occurred. Mr. Blaine, speaking of the President, said:—SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.1

    “He recommends that the tax on tobacco be retained, and thus that many millions annually shall be levied on domestic products which would far better come from a tariff on foreign fabrics.”SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.2

    “Then do you mean to imply that you would favor the repeal of the tobacco tax?”SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.3

    “Certainly; I mean just that,” said Mr. Blaine. “I should urge that it be done at once, even before the Christmas holidays. It would, in the first place, bring great relief to the growers of tobacco all over the country, and would, moreover, materially lessen the price of the article to consumers. Tobacco to millions of men is a necessity. The President calls it a luxury. It is well to remember that the luxury of yesterday becomes the necessity of to-day. Watch the number of men at work on farms, in coal mines, along railroads, in iron foundries, or in any calling, and you will find ninety-five out of one hundred chewing while they work. After each meal, the same proportion seek the solace of a pipe or cigar. These men not only pay millions of tobacco tax, but pay an enhanced price, which the tax enables the manufacturers and retailers to impose.”SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.4

    “Well, then, Mr. Blaine, would you advise the repeal of the whisky tax?”SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.5

    “No, I would not. Other considerations than those of financial administration are to be taken into account with regard to whisky. There is a moral side to it. To cheapen the price of whisky is to increase the consumption enormously. There would be no sense in urging the reform wrought by high license in many States if the National Government neutralizes the good effect of making whisky within the reach of everyone. At twenty cents a gallon it would destroy high license at once in all the States. Whisky has done a vast deal of harm in the United States. I would try to make it do some good. I would use the tax to fortify our cities on the seaboard.”SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.6

    “But, after fortification construction, would you still maintain the tax on whisky?”SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.7

    “Yes, so long as there is whisky to tax, I would tax it, and then if the National Government should have no use for the money, I would divide the tax among the Federal Union with the specific object of lightening the tax on real estate. If ultimately relief could be given in that direction, in my judgment it would be a wise and beneficial policy. Some honest but misguided friends of temperance have urged that the Government should not use the money derived from the tax on whisky. My reply is that the tax imposed on whisky by the Federal Government and the consequent enhancement of the price has been a powerful agent in temperance reform has been a powerful agent in temperance reform by putting it beyond the reach of so many.”SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.8

    Mr. Blaine’s argument for retaining the whisky tax while abolishing the tobacco tax is not good. The same argument by which he would justify free tobacco is equally valid for free whisky. To test it we have but to substitute the word “whisky” for “tobacco” in the above extract and read it again.SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.9

    To repeal the tax on whisky would be just as much of a relief to the producers of whisky as the repeal of the tobacco tax would be to the growers of tobacco. This would lessen the price of whisky to consumers as well as that would lessen the price of tobacco. Whisky to millions of men is a necessity as well as tobacco is. It is just as true of whisky as it is of tobacco that the luxury of yesterday becomes the necessity of to-day. By watching the number of men at work on farms, in coal mines, along railroads, in iron foundries, or in any calling, you will find that a vast percentage of them, though perhaps not exactly drinking while they work, do drink as well as work; and it is a fact that thousands of them actually drink while they work. After each meal the same percentage seek the solace of a drink of whisky, of wine, or of beer, as the others, and many of the same ones do of the pipe or cigar. These men also not only pay millions of whisky tax, but pay an enhanced price for the whisky itself, which the tax enables the manufacturers and retailers to impose. Then why not abolish the tax on whisky as well as on tobacco? One is just as much of a luxury as is the other; and one is no more of a necessity than is the other.SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.10

    There is another point that makes the argument of Mr. Blaine’s inconsistent, and that is that whisky is now made an essential ingredient in manufactured tobacco whether in the shape of cigars, cigarettes, fine-cut, or plug. See the tobacco advertisements everywhere of the “Piper-heidseik,” the “Champagne Cocktail—A chew as good as a drink.” Any manufacturer of tobacco can tell of large quantities of brandy, New England rum, etc., that are used in his business. A few years ago, when prohibition was proposed in Virginia, the strongest argument against it, made by a Richmond paper, was that the manufacture of tobacco would be most seriously interfered with, because the whisky, rum, brandy, etc., that was necessary to the business could not be obtained. Now why should the tax be removed from manufactured tobacco and not removed from whisky, which is the most essential ingredient in it? Suppose the tax be removed from the tobacco, the price will not be materially lessened to the consumers, as long as the manufacturers of tobacco have to pay a high tax on the whisky which they put into the tobacco.SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.11

    Mr. Blaine says the enhancement of the price of whisky has been a powerful agent in temperance reform, by putting it beyond the reach of many. But to make tobacco free does not help the matter a particle, it will rather make it worse, because the more there is consumed the more whisky there is consumed, and that only increases the intemperance. For, as he says, “To cheapen the price of whisky is to increase the consumption enormously.” Then it is certainly true that to cheapen the price of tobacco is likewise to increase the consumption enormously, and that is only to enormously increase the consumption of whisky, because the whisky is in the tobacco.SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.12

    Again says Mr. Blaine, “Whisky has done a vast deal of harm in the United States.” That is true. And it is equally true that through the mediumship of tobacco, whisky has done, and is doing, more harm in the United States than by any other means. And no effort in behalf of temperance in the United States can consistently stop short of tobacco. If whisky is to be taxed in the interests of temperance, how can tobacco be made free when it itself is saturated with whisky. If prohibition is the only remedy for the evil of the liquor traffic, then, to be effectual, prohibition must include tobacco also, or at the very least it must prohibit the use of liquor in the manufacture of tobacco. But whatever either tax or prohibition may do or try to do, there is one thing certain, no argument can be framed to justify free tobacco that will not equally justify free whisky. Tobacco and whisky are boon companions in deviltry, and the deviltry of tobacco only paves the way for that of whisky.SITI December 15, 1887, page 761.13

    J.

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