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    February 23, 1882

    “A Few Indications” The Signs of the Times, 8, 8.

    E. J. Waggoner

    It is unfortunate for those who claim that the present Sunday agitation is only a temperance movement, that the facts do not agree with their statements. The law itself, as has been shown, is purely a Sunday law; and the speeches of some of the leaders in the movement, show that their object is the better observance of the Sunday by all classes. The terms “sanitary regulation,” “police regulation,” and “temperance movement” are given to the law, in order that it may be popular with a certain class who do not readily discern its real import.SITI February 23, 1882, page 91.1

    Brother Frank Lamb, who has been laboring in Castroville and vicinity, this winter, related to us the following incident that came under his personal observation, which shows the spirit that actuates some, at least, of the defenders of the Sunday: In the course of his labor a German, who was a blacksmith by trade, commenced to keep the Sabbath. It was necessary, however, that he devote six days to his labor, and as he now closed his shop on Sabbath, he opened it on Sunday. The next day one of the trustees of the Presbyterian Church had him arrested for working on Sunday. He was convicted, and sentenced to pay a fine of twelve dollars, or spend twelve days in jail. He chose the latter. The jail accommodations, however, were so wretched, that after four days’ imprisonment he paid the remainder of his fine and was released, and returned to his work, still determined to keep the commandment-to work six days and rest the seventh.SITI February 23, 1882, page 91.2

    Soon after this, a minister of the Presbyterian Church-a man of standing in the community-preached a sermon on the enforcement of the Sunday, in which he said that no sacrifice was too great for the Government to make in enforcing the Sunday Law, even to the taking of life!SITI February 23, 1882, page 92.1

    It cannot be urged that such utterances as these are contrary to the spirit of the movement. At the last mass-meeting held in Oakland, one of the leading ministers advised his hearers to deal with none who would not close on Sunday. He said that he had been dealing with a man who kept open on Sunday, but should do so no more. It was not that the man was engaged in an illegitimate business, but that he engaged in it on Sunday.SITI February 23, 1882, page 92.2

    It is true that there are many who deprecate any such language-who respect the religious convictions of others. There are those who think that the movement can be confined to the closing of saloons. Such will sometime see their mistake. It does not take long for such a movement to pass beyond the control of the conservative few. It is easier to start a fire than to put it out.SITI February 23, 1882, page 92.3

    But we have no idea that even these conservative ones will take warning. We do not write with any such object. The “sure word of prophecy” shows that a religious persecution will come, and we see at present the premonitory symptoms. We would do nothing either to help or hinder the movement, except to sound the warning cry, that in that time of trouble all who will, may have the truth of God for their shield and buckler. E. J. W.SITI February 23, 1882, page 92.4

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