Loading...
Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "undefined".
  • Weighted Relevancy
  • Content Sequence
  • Relevancy
  • Earliest First
  • Latest First
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    Parents

    Robert Harmon

    born Standish, Maine, 28 February 1786GEGW 9.4

    died Berlin, Connecticut, 6 November 1866, aged 82yGEGW 9.5

    married Portland, Maine, 4 July 1810GEGW 9.6

    Eunice Gould

    born [probably Portland] Maine, about 1786GEGW 9.7

    died Greene County, Illinois, January 1864?, in her 78th yearGEGW 9.8

    Children, born in Maine:

    Caroline T. Harmon, born 9 August 1812; died 29 March 1883; married in Portland, 2 June 1835, the Rev. Mace Richard Clough.

    Harriet Harmon, born 1814; died 21 January 1876; married (intention Gorham 16 July 1831) the Rev. Samuel McCann.

    John B. Harmon, born 29 Dec. 1815; died 6 March 1883; married (1) in Portland, 1 Aug. 1836, Dorcas W. Gould; (2) Abigail Bagby; (3) Lucy—;

    Mary Plummer Harmon, born 21 July 1821 in Portland; died in Maine 22 May 1912; married 5 July 1842, Samuel H. Foss.

    Sarah B. Harmon, born 13 Feb. 1822 in Portland; died 25 November 1868; married Stephen Belden.

    Robert Harmon, Jr., born 13 July 1825 in Gorham; died at his parents’ home in Gorham 5 Feb. 1853.

    Ellen Gould Harmon, born 26 November 1827 in Gorham [twin]; married James Springer White.

    Elizabeth M. Harmon, born 26 November 1827 in Gorham [twin]; died 21 December 1891; married there 22 April 1849, Reuben Bangs.

    As discussed above, Robert and Eunice (Gould) Harmon were the parents of Ellen Gould (Harmon) White. No birth record was found for Robert, shown in Artemas Harmon’s The Harmon Genealogy (pages 18, 19, and 41) to have occurred in Standish, Maine, 28 February 1786. That he was born in Maine about 1783—84 is evident from his entry in the 1850 Federal Census, the first to show everyone in a household (except slaves and Indians “not taxed”) by name, age, and state (or country) of birth (Enclosure 1-8).GEGW 10.1

    In an article written by Ellen G. (Harmon) White of Greenville, Michigan, for the Advent Review and Sabbath Herald, published 21 April 1868 (page 297), she indicated her father was at “rest in hope” in Connecticut and her mother in Illinois. “Learning that my father was very feeble and near his end, ... I left my sick husband in Brookfield, Nov., 1866, and went alone to see him. He was living with one of my sisters, in Kensington, Conn.... I immediately sent for my three sisters, living in Maine. They all came, and together we, five sisters in all, surrounded the bed of our dying father, who had then passed his fourscore years” (copy supplied by Ellen G. White Estate from previously copied genealogical records).GEGW 10.2

    Kensington is in the Town of Berlin, Connecticut, and death records for Berlin indicate Robert Harmon died there of old age 6 November 1866, aged 82 years, but the columns for his occupation and place of birth were not filled in (Enclosure 1-9). From this age, a birth about 1783—84 is calculated. No record of Robert’s burial or an estate settlement was found in Connecticut records.GEGW 10.3

    As noted above, Ellen White’s sister Sarah B. Belden wrote about the death of their mother, Eunice Harmon, in Green [sic] County, Illinois, in the seventy-eighth year of her age. The obituary was published in January 1864, so it is not clear just when Eunice died, but perhaps it was in December 1863. No civil death records exist in Illinois that early, and no record of a grave marker for her was found in available cemetery inscriptions for Greene County.GEGW 10.4

    Eunice’s age at death calculates to a birth about 1785—86, based on a death in late 1863. Her entry in the 1850 Census indicates she was born in Maine about 1783—84 (Enclosure 1-8). Eunice may have been born in Kittery, where her father, in his 1832 application for a pension, stated that he was living when he enlisted in the Revolutionary War, although he also stated he moved to Portland after the war (copy of Revolutionary War pension file, W23123, supplied by Ellen G. White Estate from previously copied genealogical records). C. L. Gould noted that Joseph moved to Portland in 1784, perhaps based on Joseph’s purchase of land there that year, as noted below (notes of C. L. Gould of Wellton, Arizona, 1975 or earlier, copy supplied by Ellen G. White Estate from previously copied genealogical records 14Most of C. L. Gould’s information seems to have been taken from Stackpole’s Old Kittery and Her Families. According to an unidentified publication of what seems to be an account of Revolutionary War participants from Maine (copy supplied by Ellen G. White Estate), p. 108, Joseph Goold “[w]as living in upper part of the town [Kittery] in 1782, but removed to Portland, Me., about 1784, where he afterwards lived.”). He was clearly the Joseph Gould enumerated in Portland in the first Federal Census of 1790, with one male age 16 and upwards, four males under 16, and four females, one of whom was probably Eunice, born in the mid-1780s (Enclosure 1-10).GEGW 10.5

    The marriage of Robert Harmon and Eunice Gould took place in Portland, Maine, 4 July 1810, the Rev. Joshua Taylor officiating (“Vital Records of 80 Maine Towns before 1892,” cited in a copy of research notes supplied by Ellen G. White Estate from previously copied genealogical records; another record in these notes, citing “Vol. 3” (12,011) 15This is probably an outdated microfilm reel number at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. births, deaths, marriages Portland, p. 152, indicates Robert Harmon and Eunice Good, both of Portland, had entered their marriage intentions in Portland 17 June 1810). The Harmon Genealogy, page 41, indicates they married 11 July 1810.GEGW 10.6

    It is also indicated in The Harmon Genealogy (page 41) that Robert Harmon served in the Massachusetts Militia in 1814 (Maine was part of Massachusetts until 1820), which suggests service in the War of 1812. Robert’s supposed military service was not pursued for this report, although it was determined he and his widow were not War of 1812 pensioners.GEGW 11.1

    Research compiled by James R. Nix from deeds, directories, censuses, and other records (copy of notes revised 24 October 1991 supplied by Ellen G. White Estate from previously copied genealogical records) tracks Robert Harmon’s movements from 1820 through 1853. A hatter, Robert purchased real property in Portland in 1820, moving to and buying land in the Town of Gorham in 1825. He sold his Gorham land in 1827 and may have returned to Portland for a couple of years and then bought land in the Town of Poland. In the early 1830s, Robert again returned to Portland, where he purchased a lot from Abner Goold, doubtless his brother-in-law. In 1846, he sold his Portland property and moved back to Gorham, where he was last documented in November 1853, when he loaned some money.GEGW 11.2

    In September 1843, Robert and Eunice Harmon were dismissed from the Methodist Episcopal Church in Portland “For a breach.” They had been received as members there in 1840 (copy of record provided by Ellen G. White Estate).GEGW 11.3

    In 1850, Robert Harmon, a farmer with $1400 in real estate, was enumerated in Gorham, Maine. With him were [wife] Eunice, [son] Robert, age 23, and Melissa M. Harmon, age 11, probably a granddaughter (Enclosure 1-8).GEGW 11.4

    Robert and Eunice were not found in published indexes to the 1860 Census for Maine, Connecticut, or Michigan. Information about their children presented above is from an annotated copy of The Harmon Genealogy, page 41, and some research notes, provided by Ellen G. White Estate. No investigation has been conducted for this report to verify the information about the children.GEGW 11.5

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents