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    Temperance Reform

    Of all who claim to be numbered among the friends of temperance, Seventh-day Adventists should stand in the front ranks.—Gospel Workers, 384.ChS 218.5

    On the temperance question, take your position without wavering. Be as firm as a rock.—Gospel Workers, 394.ChS 219.1

    We have a work to do along temperance lines besides that of speaking in public. We must present our principles in pamphlets and in our papers. We must use every possible means of arousing our people to their duty to get into connection with those who know not the truth. The success we have had in missionary work has been fully proportionate to the self-denying, self-sacrificing efforts we have made. The Lord alone knows how much we might have accomplished if as a people we had humbled ourselves before Him, and proclaimed the temperance truth in clear, straight lines.—Gospel Workers, 385.ChS 219.2

    The temperance question is to receive decided support from God's people. Intemperance is striving for the mastery; self-indulgence is increasing, and the publications treating on health reform are greatly needed. Literature bearing on this point is the helping hand of the gospel, leading souls to search the Bible for a better understanding of the truth. The note of warning against the great evil of intemperance should be sounded; and that this may be done, every Sabbathkeeper should study and practice the instruction contained in our health periodicals and our health books. And they should do more than this: they should make earnest efforts to circulate these publications among their neighbors.—The Southern Watchman, November 20, 1902 (Pacific Union Recorder, November 20, 1902).ChS 219.3

    Present the total abstinence pledge, asking that the money they would otherwise spend for liquor, tobacco, or like indulgences, be devoted to the relief of the sick, poor, or for the training of children and youth for usefulness in the world.—The Ministry of Healing, 211.ChS 219.4

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