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Health, or, How to Live

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    LEAVENED BREAD

    GRAHAM BREAD. — Into three pints of warm water stir Graham flour sufficient to make a batter about as thick as can be well stirred with a spoon. To this add two large spoonfuls of hop yeast. Cover and set in a warm place to rise. When light stir again, and let it rise the second time. This will make two ordinary loaves of bread. Put into tins and set in a warm place about ten minutes, or till it begins to rise a third time. Bake about one hour.HHTL 34.4

    NOTE. — If mixed too thick the bread will be dry and hard; or if it gets too light before baking, it is not so good; but made just right, it will be nearly as fine-grained and spongy as the best fine flour bread.HHTL 34.5

    SWEET BROWN BREAD. — Take one quart of rye flour, two quarts of coarse Indian meal, one pint wheat meal half a teaspoon of molasses or brown sugar, and one gill of potato yeast. Mingle the ingredients into as stiff a dough as can be stirred with a spoon, using warm water for wetting. Let it rise several hours, or over night; then put it in a large deep pan, and bake five or six hours. This would be a much more wholesome “wedding cake” than we are accustomed to have proffered us on certain interesting occasions.HHTL 34.6

    BUNNS. — One cup sugar, three pints of milk, one cup yeast, and flour enough for a batter like common bread “sponge.” Let it stand over night, then add one cup sugar, one cup of butter; mould like biscuit, and let it rise again before baking.HHTL 35.1

    POTATO OR HOP YEAST. — Wash, pare, and grate, one dozen large potatoes. Boil two large handfuls of hops in five pints of water, and strain it on to the grated potatoes. Add a teacupful of sugar and one-half teacup of salt. Put all in a tin pail or pan, and set into a kettle of boiling water, and stir occasionally till thoroughly cooked. When nearly cool add a pint of good yeast and let it rise. One tablespoonful of this yeast is sufficient for an ordinary loaf of bread. If in a cool place it will keep several months in summer without souring.HHTL 35.2

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