Loading...
Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents

Health, or, How to Live

 - Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "undefined".
  • Weighted Relevancy
  • Content Sequence
  • Relevancy
  • Earliest First
  • Latest First
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    LOCAL BATHS

    The SITZ-BATH may be taken in a common-sized wash-tub, though we have tubs made on purpose, which are higher at the back, with so much water as nearly to fill the tub when the person sits down. The person should remove all his clothing, except his shoes and stockings, and be well wrapped up in his bath with a comfortable. Many times it is desirable to undress the feet also, and take a warm foot-bath while a tepid sitz-bath is taken. In this case, the feet should be dipped into the cool water when taken out of the warm-bath. A cool wet cloth or cap should be worn on the head. This bath is continued from five to ninety minutes, to meet condition; though the more usual time is from fifteen to thirty minutes.HHTL 84.1

    The SHALLOW BATH may be taken in any tub sufficiently large to allow the person to be immersed in water to the hips, as he sits or stands in it. The upper portion of the body should be covered with a blanket or warm wrapper. This bath is continued from five to thirty minutes. Sometimes, however, it is taken sitting, in a half-bath tub, an attendant rubbing the limbs, and in such cases it is continued from one to five minutes.HHTL 85.1

    The HAND-WASHING is performed by dipping the hands frequently in a vessel of warm water, and rubbing vigorously a limited portion of the surface, as over the chest, abdomen, liver, spleen, or spinal column. Severe congestions are sometimes relieved by this process — dipping the hands alternately in cold and hot water, and continuing it ten to twenty minutes.HHTL 85.2

    FOOT-BATHS are made from one to five inches in depth, in a keeler or common pail, and are continued from five to twenty minutes. HAND-BATHS taken alone or with foot-baths are often beneficial.HHTL 85.3

    When FOMENTATIONS are to be applied to any part of the trunk of the body, the better plan is to double a woolen blanket and spread it in a bed, and let the patient undress and lie down upon it. A flannel folded to about six thicknesses is then wrung out of hot water and placed upon the part to be fomented; the blanket is brought over it, first from one side and then the other, and then the bed clothes spread over all. The cloth should be applied at such a temperature as to feel decidedly warm, or pleasantly (not unpleasantly) hot; and should be replaced by a fresh one as often as it grows cool — say from six or eight to twelve or fifteen minutes. The head must be kept cool and the feet warm. The applications may be continued from ten minutes to two hours, as occasion requires. On finally removing the flannel cloth, the part fomented must be washed off with cool water — say at 85 degrees — unless a cool bath is to follow, or a cool bandage or compress is to be applied. Here is an important point. Whenever water is applied to any part, or the whole, of the body at so high a temperature as to relax the coats of the capillaries and distend them with blood, it must be followed by an application at so low a temperature as to constringe the vessels and restore their tone. Otherwise there is great liability to take cold. Hence the old-fashioned way of “soaking the feet in hot water,” on going to bed at night, for a cold, had to be done with great care to avoid adding to the cold. If the hot bath had been followed by a cold one, there would have been no difficulty.HHTL 85.4

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents