Loading...
Larger font
Smaller font
Copy
Print
Contents

Health, or, How to Live

 - Contents
  • Results
  • Related
  • Featured
No results found for: "undefined".
  • Weighted Relevancy
  • Content Sequence
  • Relevancy
  • Earliest First
  • Latest First
    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents

    SPIRITS, COFFEE, AND TEA

    ALCOHOLIC LIQUORS of all kinds, whether strong beer, cider, wine or brandy, should never be taken except as drugs; because, besides the danger of a drunkard’s grave, they are all stimulants; they impart no nourishment to the system, but force its action to an unnatural degree. The idea that these liquors promote digestion is all a delusion. They give to the stomach an unnatural and forced action, which while in health, it does not need; and the longer it is subjected to this driving process, the more will it depend on stimulants. When the stomach is excited in this way, the brain also is excited; and whoever uses alcoholic drinks as a beverage, is so far a drunkard; for no dividing-line can be drawn — no transition boundary can be made — between him who drinks moderately, and him who drinks excessively. It is all wrong, and only wrong. It is all intoxicating, and only intoxicating. He who drinks a little is a little drunk; he who drinks largely is largely drunk. To be temperate in the use of good things in their place, is to use them with proper moderation. To be temperate in the use of bad things, or things out of place, is to let them alone. The way to be temperate in religion, is to have a zeal according to knowledge. The way to be temperate in fanaticism, is to let it alone. Temperance in eating bread is moderation; temperance in regard to stimulants and narcotics is total abstinence.HHTL 330.2

    COFFEE is objectionable for a similar reason; it is a stimulant — a kind of narcotic stimulant, bearing some resemblance to opium; and so powerful is its action, that it is considered and used as a most certain antidote to poisoning from opium. And it can readily be seen, that unless it was an article of much power itself, it could never overpower such a poison. Coffee should never be placed on any other list than that of medicines; it should never be drank as a luxury or beverage. Mothers should never be so tender and affectionate for their drink. That mother is insane who will value the immediate gratification of her child more than its future enjoyment of health and soundness. Her child will desire no such indulgence, if it had never been accustomed to it. If the habit has been formed, let it be at once abolished. There are few things over which my very soul has groaned so deeply, as seeing mothers so ignorantly or carelessly undermining the constitutions of those whom they love, and for whose welfare, moral and physical, they are greatly responsible. Yet, if they are determined to gratify their tender ones at all hazards of their constitutions, they are, of course, at liberty to do so; or if any are disposed to treat themselves in the same way, there is no evil law against it; but they break another law, which must be met, — a law of nature written by Jehovah on every nerve of the human body.HHTL 331.1

    TEA is another objectionable article, because of its stimulating properties. This is a direct, diffusible, and active stimulant. Its effects are very similar to those of alcoholic drinks, except that of drunkenness. Like alcohol, it gives, for a time, increased vivacity of spirits. Like alcohol, it increases, beyond its healthy and natural action, the whole animal and mental machinery; after which there comes a reaction — a corresponding languor and debility. The wash-woman becomes exhausted, and must have her bowl of tea to recruit her energies, instead of giving nature a chance to recover herself. She depends upon art rather than nature, and each time lowers the standard of her own permanent strength. She accomplishes more in a short time, while her strength is artificial instead of natural; but is gradually, though perhaps imperceptibly, wearing herself out before her time. The nurse keeps herself awake nights by this artificial process; and each time, by imperceptible steps, lessens her natural strength. She thinks, with the wash-woman, that tea does her good — strengthens her, because, like the rum-drinker, she feels better under its immediately stimulating effects.HHTL 331.2

    The time was when ministers, instead of being largely inspired with the Holy Ghost, wrote and delivered their sermons under the inspiration of ardent spirits; but now, seeing that to be morally and physically wrong, they not unfrequently labor under that artificial inspiration, which is quite as effectual, contained in tea. By this process, they gradually impair their own natural energy of body and mind; for, when we drive up and overtax the forces of nature by stimulus, they ultimately fall in the rear of their original process of action. The green teas are much more powerful stimulants than the black. The Chinese do not use the green teas. Not long since, meeting a young Chinese, the inquiry was made why they did not drink their green teas. Putting his hands up to his head, he said, “They burn all the hair off.” They were too stimulating to the brain and nerves. — Philosophy of Health.HHTL 332.1

    A BAD PRACTICE. — Many persons who use kerosene lamps are in the habit, when going to bed, or when leaving a room for a short time, of turning the wick down low in order to save a trifle of the consumption of oil. The consequence is that the air of the room soon becomes vitiated by the unconsumed oil vapors by the gas produced by combustion, and also by the minute particles of smoke and soot which are thrown off. Air thus poisoned is deadly in its effects, and the wonder is that more persons are not immediately and fatally injured by breathing it. Irritation and inflammation of the throat and lungs, headache, dizziness and nausea are among its effects. — World’s Crisis.HHTL 332.2

    Larger font
    Smaller font
    Copy
    Print
    Contents