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From Here to Forever

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    The Most Horrible of Crimes

    But most horrible among the fiendish deeds of the dreadful centuries was the St. Bartholomew Massacre. The king of France, urged on by priests and prelates, lent his sanction. A bell, tolling at dead of night, was a signal for the slaughter. Protestants by thousands, sleeping in their homes, trusting the honor of their king, were dragged forth and murdered.HF 170.1

    For seven days the massacre continued in Paris. By order of the king it was extended to all towns where Protestants were found. Noble and peasant, old and young, mother and child, were cut down together. Throughout France 70,000 of the flower of the nation perished.HF 170.2

    “When the news of the massacre reached Rome, the exultation among the clergy knew no bounds. The cardinal of Lorraine rewarded the messenger with a thousand crowns; the cannon of St. Angelo thundered forth a joyous salute; and bells rang out from every steeple; bonfires turned night into day; and Gregory XIII, attended by the cardinals and other ecclesiastical dignitaries, went in long procession to the church of St. Louis, where the cardinal of Lorraine chanted a Te Deum. ... A medal was struck to commemorate the massacre. ... A French priest ... spoke of ‘that day so full of happiness and joy, when the most holy father received the news, and went in solemn state to render thanks to God and St. Louis.’”4Henry White, The Massacre of St. Bartholomew, ch. 14, par. 34.HF 170.3

    The same master spirit that urged on the St. Bartholomew Massacre led in the scenes of the Revolution. Jesus Christ was declared an impostor, and the cry of the French infidels was “Crush the Wretch,” meaning Christ. Blasphemy and wickedness went hand in hand. In all this, homage was paid to Satan, while Christ, in His characteristics of truth, purity, and unselfish love, was “crucified.”HF 170.4

    “The beast that ascendeth out of the bottomless pit shall make war against them, and shall overcome them, and kill them.” Revelation 11:7. The atheistic power that ruled in France during the Revolution and the Reign of Terror did wage such war against God and His Word. The worship of the Deity was abolished by the National Assembly. Bibles were collected and publicly burned. The institutions of the Bible were abolished. The weekly rest day was set aside, and in its stead every tenth day was devoted to reveling. Baptism and the Communion were prohibited. Announcements posted over burial places declared death to be an eternal sleep.HF 171.1

    All religious worship was prohibited, except that of “liberty” and the country. The “constitutional bishop of Paris was brought forward ... to declare to the Convention that the religion which he had taught so many years was, in every respect, a piece of priestcraft, which had no foundation either in history or sacred truth. He disowned, in solemn and explicit terms, the existence of the Deity to whose worship he had been consecrated.”5Scott, vol. 1, ch. 17.HF 171.2

    “And they that dwell upon the earth shall rejoice over them, and make merry, and shall send gifts one to another; because these two prophets tormented them that dwelt on the earth.” Revelation 11:10. Infidel France had silenced the reproving voice of God's two witnesses. The word of truth lay “dead” in her streets, and those who hated God's law were jubilant. Men publicly defied the King of heaven.HF 171.3

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