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From Here to Forever

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    “Midnight Cry”

    The arguments carried strong conviction, and the “midnight cry” was heralded by thousands of believers. Like a tidal wave the movement swept from city to city, from village to village. Fanaticism disappeared like early frost before the rising sun. The work was similar to those seasons of returning unto the Lord which among ancient Israel followed messages of reproof from His servants. There was little ecstatic joy, but rather deep searching of heart, confession of sin, and forsaking of the world. There was unreserved consecration to God.HF 247.2

    Of all the great religious movements since the days of the apostles, none have been more free from human imperfection and the wiles of Satan than was that of the autumn of 1844.HF 247.3

    At the call, “The bridegroom cometh,” the waiting ones “arose and trimmed their lamps”; they studied the Word of God with an intensity of interest before unknown. It was not the most talented, but the most humble and devoted, who were the first to obey the call. Farmers left their crops in the fields, mechanics laid down their tools and with rejoicing went out to give the warning. The churches in general closed their doors against this message, and a large company of those who received it withdrew their connection. Unbelievers who flocked to the Adventist meetings felt convincing power attending the message, “Behold, the bridegroom cometh!” Faith brought answers to prayer. Like showers of rain upon the thirsty earth, the Spirit of grace descended upon the earnest seekers. Those who expected soon to stand face to face with their Redeemer felt a solemn joy. The Holy Spirit melted the heart.HF 248.1

    Those who received the message came up to the time when they hoped to meet their Lord. They prayed much with one another. They often met in secluded places to commune with God, and the voice of intercession ascended to heaven from fields and groves. The assurance of the Saviour's approval was more necessary to them than their daily food, and if a cloud darkened their minds, they did not rest until they felt the witness of pardoning grace.HF 248.2

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