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Life Sketches of Ellen G. White

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    Aims and Objects

    It was primarily for the purpose of giving the students a practical fitting up for service in many lines of Christian endeavor, that the managers of the Avondale School had been planning all through the years. Clearly and forcefully Mrs. White emphasized, over and over again, the work before the school, and the great advantages accruing to students and teachers through daily contact with the practical affairs of everyday life. In September, 1898, she wrote:LS 368.1

    “We need more teachers and more talent to educate the students in various lines, that many persons may go from this place willing and able to carry to others the knowledge which they have received. Orphan boys and girls are to find a home here. Buildings should be erected for a hospital, and boats should be provided to accommodate the school. A competent farm manager should be employed, also wise, energetic men to act as superintendents of the several industrial enterprises, men who will use their undivided talents in teaching the students how to work.LS 368.2

    “Many young people will come to school who desire a training in industrial lines. The industrial instruction should include the keeping of accounts, carpentry, and everything that is comprehended in farming. Preparation should also be made for teaching blacksmithing, painting, shoemaking, cooking, baking, laundering, mending, typewriting, and printing.LS 368.3

    [Note.—Some of the industries undertaken at the Avondale School have developed to large proportions. Concerning the printing plant and the health food factory, it was reported at the 1909 General Conference: “The work in our printing plant and in our food factory has grown until at the present time we have an income of from two to three thousand dollars a month [gross] from these departments. This amount in cash each month helps us out considerably. But if we had not acted upon the instruction God gave us on this matter, we would not have had this income, and would not have been able to help so many students.” (Bulletin, 1909, 83.)

    At the 1913 General Conference, the principal of the Avondale School reported: “As a missionary and educational factor, the printing department is proving to be of great importance. It is self-supporting, and employs about twenty-five students. Several others are members of the industrial class. Literature has been produced by the press up to the present time in Fijian, Tongan, Tahitian, Rarotongan, Maori, Singapore-Malay, Java-Malay, Niue, Samoan, and English. Six monthly publications and one weekly journal are issued.” (Bulletin, 1913, 149, 150.)]

    Every power at our command is to be brought into this training work, that students may go out equipped for the duties of practical life....

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