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    REMARKS ON THE DIFFERENT MOTIONS In the Order of Their Precedence

    PRIVILEGED MOTIONS

    1. TO FIX THE TIME TO WHICH TO ADJOURN. This motion is not a motion to adjourn, but, as its name signifies, it is a motion simply to fix the time to which the adjournment will stand when the motion to adjourn is carried. It may be made at any time during a meeting. Its form is as follows: “I move that when we adjourn, we adjourn to” such a date, or “to meet again at” such a date, naming the date. The Diagram will show when it is a privileged motion, and what rules apply to it.KSDPR 8.2

    2. TO ADJOURN. - This motion, as shown in the Diagram, takes precedence of all motions except to fix the time to which to adjourn, unless it is in some way modified, when it loses its privileged character, and stands as a principal motion. If the meeting is such that the object for which it was called is accomplished at one gathering, so that there will probably be no occasion for meeting again on that business, it is proper to adjourn sine die; that is, “without day,” or date. But if there are to be future meetings, as in case of regularly organized societies, the adjournment should be to some definite time, as, for instance, the time for the next regular meeting, if such time is fixed; if the time is not fixed, let the adjournment be to some time named in the motion itself, or to the call of the Chair, or of a committee, or of any one authorized to fix the time for the next regular meeting.KSDPR 8.3

    3. QUESTIONS OF PRIVILEGE. - These must not be confounded with privileged questions. The question whether disorder shall be restrained, whether an open window endangering the health or comfort of any may not be closed, whether charges against the official character of any member shall be allowed, etc., are examples of question of privilege. The form is, addressing the chairman, and obtaining the floor: “I rise to a question of privilege.” The chairman requests the member to state his question, then he decides whether it is a question of privilege or not. It is then disposed of according to rules in Diagram.KSDPR 9.1

    4. ORDERS OF THE DAY. - By this expression is meant those subjects the consideration of which is assigned to some particular time. When it is desirable to consider a subject at some future time, the motion is made that such a subject be made the “order of the day” for such a time, fixing the precise time; or if regular business has been made the general order for such time, that the subject be made the special order. It requires a two-thirds vote to make a subject a special order, and then it takes precedence of the general orders. When the time arrives, the chairman announces the fact, or some member calls for the orders of the day. The chairman then says, “Shall the orders of the day be taken up?” If no one objects, the current business is suspended as if by an adjournment, and the orders of the day are at once taken up. If any one objects, the question, “Shall the orders be taken up?” must at once be put to vote by the chairman. If decided in the affirmative, the current business is suspended as above; if in the negative, the orders of the day are postponed only till the question then before the assembly is disposed of.KSDPR 9.2

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