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    INCIDENTAL MOTIONS

    In this class there are five motions, as shown in the Diagram. These are: 1. Appeal (from the decision of the Chair on questions of order); 2. Objection to the Consideration of a Question; 3. Reading of Papers; 4. Withdrawal of a Motion; and 5. Suspension of the Rules.KSDPR 10.1

    1. APPEAL (QUESTIONS OF ORDER). - A member detecting any disorder in the proceedings of the assembly or in the deportment or decorum of members, which he wishes to correct, obtains the floor, and says, “I rise to a point of order.” The chairman responds, “Please state your point of order.” The chairman then decides whether the point is well taken or not. If any member thinks the Chair has not decided the question correctly, or in accordance with justice, he may bring the matter before the assembly for action, by saying, “I appeal from the decision of the Chair.” If any one seconds this appeal, the chairman at once states the question, “Shall the decision of the Chair be sustained?” and immediately puts it to vote, unless it is disposed of in some other way, as indicated in the Diagram. The motions to “lay the question on the table,” and for the “previous question,” when applicable, affect the appeal only.KSDPR 11.1

    The effect of this motion may be illustrated by a case like this: Suppose a member rises to speak upon a question, and some other member thinks he is not in order in so doing. The latter rises to a point of order, and states the reason why he thinks the one who had risen is not entitled to the privilege of discussing the question. The Chair perhaps decides that the point is well taken, and that the member should not speak. Some one thinks otherwise, and says, “I appeal from the decision of the Chair.” This being seconded, the question is immediately put, “Shall the decision of the Chair be sustained?” The vote being taken, if a majority vote to sustain the Chair, the member must desist from speaking; but if a majority vote in the negative, that is, that the decision of the Chair be not sustained, the member has the right to go on with his remarks as if the Chair had not decided otherwise, and no objection had been made to his speaking.KSDPR 11.2

    2. OBJECTION TO CONSIDERING A QUESTION. Some question may be introduced which a majority of the assembly may think is not a proper or profitable question for public consideration. If so, some member rises and says, “I object to the consideration of this question.” The chairman then immediately (no second being required) ascertains the minds of the members, by submitting the question in this form: “Shall the question be discussed?” If decided in the negative, the whole matter is dismissed for that session. The object of this motion is to avoid altogether any question which may be deemed irrelevant or improper.KSDPR 12.1

    3. READING OF PAPERS. - When matters are brought before an assembly by written communications, it is often desirable that such communications have more than one reading. When any one calls for the reading of a paper, the chairman orders it read, if no one objects. If objection is made, the question must be put to vote without debate or amendment.KSDPR 12.2

    4. WITHDRAWAL OF A MOTION. - The person who makes a motion can withdraw it if no objection is made. If objection is made, he can withdraw it only by obtaining leave so to do by means of a motion to that effect. This motion can not be debated or amended. When a motion is withdrawn, it is the same as if it had never been made.KSDPR 13.1

    5. SUSPENSION OF THE RULES. - When, as is often the case, the regular rules of a society would interfere with the accomplishment of certain business which it is desirable to bring at once to completion, provision is made for a suspension of the rules in order to accomplish this object. The form of the motion is, “to suspend the rules which interfere with,” etc., specifying the object of the suspension.KSDPR 13.2

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