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The Ellen G. White Writings

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    The Changes in the 1911 Edition

    We turn to the W. C. White communications here mentioned to gain a picture of what was involved in bringing out the 1911 book. The key points, which for clarity we will present in numbered paragraphs, are:EGWW 130.3

    1. The most noticeable change in the new edition, is the improvement in the illustrations....EGWW 130.4

    2. The thirteen Appendix notes of the old edition, occupying thirteen pages, have been replaced by thirty-one notes occupying twelve pages.... The Biographical Notes have been omitted. [Neither the Appendix notes nor Biographical Notes were prepared by Mrs. White.]EGWW 130.5

    3. The general Index has been enlarged from twelve to twenty-two pages.EGWW 130.6

    4. In the body of the book, the most noticeable improvement is the introduction of historical references. In the old edition, over seven hundred Biblical references were given, but in only a few instances were there any historical references to the authorities quoted or referred to. In the new edition the reader will find more than four hundred references to eighty-eight authors and authorities.EGWW 130.7

    5. In a few instances, new quotations from historians, preachers, and present-day writers, have been used in the place of the old, because they are more forceful, or because we have been unable to find the old ones. In each case where there has been such a change, Mother has given faithful attention to the proposed substitution, and has approved of the change.EGWW 130.8

    6. In spelling, punctuation, and capitalization, changes have been made to bring this book into uniformity of style with the other volumes of this series [The Desire of Ages and Patriarchs and Prophets].EGWW 131.1

    7. In eight or ten places, time references have been changed because of the lapse of time since the book was first published.EGWW 131.2

    8. In several places, forms of expression have been changed to avoid giving unnecessary offense. An example of this will be found in the change of the word “Romish” to “Roman” or “Roman Catholic.”EGWW 131.3

    9. In two places the phrase “divinity of Christ” is changed to “deity of Christ.” And the words “religious toleration” have been changed to “religious liberty.”EGWW 131.4

    In the new edition, the rise of the papacy in 538, and its fall in 1798, are spoken of as its “supremacy” and “downfall,” instead of its “establishment” and “abolition,” as in the old edition.EGWW 131.5

    In each of these places the more accurate form of expression has been duly considered and approved by the author of the book.EGWW 131.6

    10. On pages 50, 563, 564, 580, 581, and in a few other places where there were statements regarding the papacy which are strongly disputed by Roman Catholics, and which are difficult to prove from accessible histories, the wording in the new edition has been so changed that the statement falls easily within the range of evidence that is readily obtainable.EGWW 131.7

    Regarding these and similar passages, which might stir up bitter and unprofitable controversies, Mother has often said: “What I have written regarding the arrogance and the assumptions of the papacy, is true. Much historical evidence regarding these matters has been designedly destroyed; nevertheless, that the book may be of the greatest benefit to Catholics and others, and that needless controversies may be avoided it is better to have all statements regarding the assumptions of the pope and the claims of the papacy stated so moderately as to be easily and clearly proved from accepted histories that are within the reach of our ministers and students.”EGWW 131.8

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