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The Great Second Advent Movement: Its Rise and Progress

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    TESTIMONIALS OF EYE-WITNESSES

    M. G. Kellogg, M.D

    As to Mrs. White’s condition while in vision, a few statements from eye-witnesses may be in place. The first is from M. G. Kellogg, M.D., who refers to the first vision given in Michigan, May 29, 1853, at a meeting held in Tyrone, Livingston County. He says:—GSAM 205.2

    “Sister White was in vision about twenty minutes or half an hour. As she went into vision every one present seemed to feel the power and presence of God, and some of us did indeed feel the Spirit of God resting upon us mightily. We were engaged in prayer and social meeting Sabbath morning at about nine o’clock. Brother White, my father, and Sister White had prayed, and I was praying at the time. There had been no excitement, no demonstrations. We did plead earnestly with God, however, that he would bless the meeting with his presence, and that he would bless the work in Michigan. As Sister White gave that triumphant shout of ‘Glory! g-l-o-r-y-! g-l-o-r-y-!’ which you have heard her give so often as she goes into vision, Brother White arose and informed the audience that his wife was in vision. After stating the manner of her visions, and that she did not breathe while in vision, he invited any one who wished to do so to come forward and examine her. Dr. Drummond, a physician, who was also a First-day Adventist preacher, who (before he saw her in vision) had declared her visions to be of mesmeric origin, and that he could give her a vision, stepped forward, and after a thorough examination, turned very pale, and remarked, ‘She doesn’t breathe!’GSAM 206.1

    “I am quite certain that she did not breathe at that time while in vision, nor in any of several others which she has had when I was present. The coming out of the vision was as marked as her going into it. The first indication we had that the vision was ended, was in her again beginning to breathe. She drew her first breath deep, long, and full, in a manner showing that her lungs had been entirely empty of air. After drawing the first breath, several minutes passed before she drew the second, which filled the lungs precisely as did the first; then a pause of two minutes, and a third inhalation, after which the breathing became natural.” Signed, “M. G. Kellogg, M.D., Battle Creek, Mich., Dec. 28, 1890.”GSAM 206.2

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