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The Great Second Advent Movement: Its Rise and Progress

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    Union College, Nebraska

    The General Conference of 1889 had under advisement the proposition to construct a college at some point convenient for the following nine State conferences, namely, Iowa, Minnesota, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Dakota, Texas, Colorado, and Arkansas. A committee was accordingly appointed by the conference whose duty it was to select a desirable location for the school. When the citizens of such places as Des Moines, Ia., Fremont and Lincoln, Neb., and other places learned what we were about to do, they vied with one another in offers of contributions to the enterprise, so desirous were those of each place of having the buildings located in their town. As Lincoln, Neb., made the most liberal offers, and as it was deemed the most feasible site, the school was located there.GSAM 397.3

    The main building, Union College proper, is a structure 141 x 84 feet. The height from the ground to the top of the dome is 100 feet. Besides this building there are two dormitories, each 104 x 104 feet, three stories high. It was anticipated that the proceeds of land donated would meet at least one half of the expense of fitting up this central college of the denomination, in which workers were to be educated in separate departments in English, Scandinavian, and German by teachers in their native tongues.GSAM 398.1

    The buildings were dedicated Sept. 24, 1891, and the school opened September 30. The enrollment for the first year was 301. In 1892 the school opened with an attendance of 222, and the enrollment for the year was 553. Of these seventy-one were in the German department, and eighty-five in the Scandinavian.GSAM 398.2

    A farm is connected with the college, furnishing work for students who desire to labor in agricultural lines. The college has also a bakery, where health foods are manufactured to some extent. During the year 1903 an association was organized for the purpose of publishing papers and books in the German, Swedish, and Danish-Norwegian languages. This association owns its printing house and the whole American printing business of the denomination for these nationalities. The work is carried on principally by the students. Not only are they instructed in the printing business, but here they gain an experience by actually doing missionary work.GSAM 398.3

    The medical work is also represented in connection with this college. By economizing room it was discovered that the school could dispense with one of its large dormitories, and thus, with a little expense, a sanitarium was put in operation, and is doing an excellent work.GSAM 398.4

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